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A model of the Supersonic Low-Altitude Missile (SLAM)
Putin appears to have just announced that they are or will use the USA’s old Supersonic Low Altitude Missile (SLAM) from project Pluto: “On May 14, 1961, the world’s first nuclear ramjet engine, Tory IIA-I, mounted on a railroad car, roared to life for just a few seconds. Almost immediately after its successful test run, work began on Tory II-B, a lighter, more powerful engine. Tory II-B never got beyond the drawing board, but three years after Tory IIA-I, Tory-II-C was tested, and a week later it was run for five minutes at full-power, producing 513 megawatts – the equivalent of more than 35,000 pounds of thrust.
Despite its success, the Pentagon and Pluto sponsors were having second thoughts about the project. Military factions worried that Pluto would be dangerous to U.S. allies. Before it even began to drop bombs, Pluto would deafen, flatten, and irradiate people along its flight path. Moreover, the Air Force had already begun deploying ballistic missiles capable of carrying out the missions planned for Pluto. On July 1, 1964, seven years after its inception, Project Pluto was canceled by the Atomic Energy Commission and the Air Force. The total cost of the project was $260 million.
” (Pluto Project – US NNSA-DOE)

Since the nuclear engine could give Pluto unlimited range, it would cruise until ordered to its target.” (Pluto Project- US NNSA-DOE)

Russia’s floating nuclear reactors are another example of a discarded US nuclear technology which Putin has been promoting. Cummins based in Trump VP mike Pence’s hometown, and where his brother Ed was VP until December 2017, has provided engines to Russia since the 1970s, including for military purposes. The Koch brother’s father taught Stalin’s Russia how to make gasoline; Ford taught Stalin’s Russia how to make cars and trucks. More recently they have partnerships with VW and in 2006 even imported an old Daimler Chrysler Facility to Russia. They have stolen radiation hardened technology: https://miningawareness.wordpress.com/2018/01/30/texas-man-sentenced-for-conspiring-to-illegally-export-radiation-hardened-integrated-circuits-to-russia-and-china-for-military-space-program-applications/

According to the book Nuclear Juggernaught by Martin Bond, Springfields in the UK supplied cylinders of Uranium Hexaflouride to the Soviet Union/Russia (The UK refuses to answer if this is true or false. At the time it was UK government owned!) ExxonMobil drilled, operates and partially owns Russia’s Sakahalin 1 project. Shell is at Sakahalin 2. The examples appear legion and raise the question of if Russia has ever invented anything. And, why the west continues to supply them with technology. For the corporations it is greed.

Apparently too late now, without drastic action either within Russia or from without, Putin may have this nuclear powered missile buzzing in circles, and possibly irradiating all in its path. Does anyone as brave and ethical as Bonhoeffer live today? (S/he that hath ears let them hear.) Most likely the other announced projects are either knock-offs of old US or German technology or new US or European technology given to Russia, or bought or stolen by them. Let’s not forget that during and after WWII the original nuclear power and weapons were developed in both the US and Russia with critical input of German/German-trained scientists.

Trump giving away new US taxpayer funded nuclear tech to buddy Putin-Russia. Russia may have gotten some relevant info from here already: https://miningawareness.wordpress.com/2017/11/10/us-nasa-and-russia-sign-agreement-on-researching-exploring-deep-space-nasa-has-started-already-while-russia-is-preparing-apparently-to-get-tech-transfer-from-usa-sanctions-what-sanctions/

Project Pluto

A model of the Supersonic Low-Altitude Missile (SLAM).
Introduction
For more than 50 years, the Nevada Test Site, now known at the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS), has been used as a test bed for a multitude of scientific projects, among which was the Supersonic Low-Altitude Missile (SLAM). The concept was a revolutionary new type of propulsion originated at Lawrence Radiation Laboratory, which eventually became Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory: nuclear ramjet power. Project Pluto was the code name for the project, which also referred to the weapon itself.

From Drawing Board to Reality

The principle behind the ramjet was relatively simple: draw in air at the front of the vehicle under ram (great force) pressure, heat it to make it expand, and then exhaust it out the back, providing thrust.

Using a nuclear reactor to heat the air was a relatively new idea. Unlike commercial reactors, which are surrounded by concrete, the Pluto reactor had to be small and compact enough to fly, but durable enough to survive long trips to potential targets.

The success of this project would depend upon a series of technological advances in metallurgy and materials sciences. The motors necessary to control the in-flight reactor had to operate under extreme heat and intense radioactivity. The need to maintain supersonic speed at low altitude in all kinds of weather meant the reactor had to survive temperatures of 2,500 degrees Fahrenheit; conditions that would melt the metals used in most jet and rocket engines.

Launched from the ground using rocket boosters, Pluto would attain cruising altitude far from populated areas, and then the nuclear reactor would engage. Since the nuclear engine could give Pluto unlimited range, it would cruise until ordered to its target. Once it reached the target, Pluto would deliver its payload with pin point accuracy.

The 500-megawatt reactor designed for the experiment was christened “Tory.” Because of Tory’s operating temperature of 2,500 degrees Fahrenheit, even high temperature alloys would lose structural strength. To overcome this, Coors Porcelain Company, based in Colorado, manufactured parts that could stand the heat and provide even temperature distribution in the Tory reactor, which contained 500,000 pencil shaped fuel elements.

To test Pluto’s reactor, the project moved from Livermore, California to new facilities constructed on eight square miles of Jackass Flats at the Nevada Test Site. The complex consisted of six miles of roads, the critical assembly building, the control building, the assembly and shop buildings, and utilities.

Since Pluto’s Tory reactor would become intensely radioactive when operated, a two-mile, fully automated railroad was constructed to move the reactor back and forth between its static test stand and the disassembly building at the Nevada Test Site.

For a five- minute, full-power test, approximately one ton of air per second was forced over 14 million one-inch steel balls in four steel tanks at 1,350 degrees Fahrenheit heated by oil-burning heaters. It took 25 miles of oil well casing pipe to store the million pounds of pressurized air used to simulate ramjet flight condition for Pluto.

Success!

On May 14, 1961, the world’s first nuclear ramjet engine, Tory IIA-I, mounted on a railroad car, roared to life for just a few seconds. Almost immediately after its successful test run, work began on Tory II-B, a lighter, more powerful engine. Tory II-B never got beyond the drawing board, but three years after Tory IIA-I, Tory-II-C was tested, and a week later it was run for five minutes at full-power, producing 513 megawatts – the equivalent of more than 35,000 pounds of thrust.

Pentagon Pulls Plug on Pluto

Despite its success, the Pentagon and Pluto sponsors were having second thoughts about the project. Military factions worried that Pluto would be dangerous to U.S. allies. Before it even began to drop bombs, Pluto would deafen, flatten, and irradiate people along its flight path. Moreover, the Air Force had already begun deploying ballistic missiles capable of carrying out the missions planned for Pluto.

On July 1, 1964, seven years after its inception, Project Pluto was canceled by the Atomic Energy Commission and the Air Force. The total cost of the project was $260 million. At its peak, the project employed some 35 people at the laboratory and about 100 at the Nevada Test Site.

Tory-II-C on its rail car.
https://www.nnss.gov/docs/fact_sheets/DOENV_763.pdf

Since nuclear power gave it almost unlimited range, the missile could cruise in circles over the ocean until ordered “down to the deck” for its supersonic dash to targets….”
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Project_Pluto

US Facility was disassembled in 2011. If the info wasn’t publicly available Russia may have gotten additional info from this: https://energy.gov/sites/prod/files/em/emrecovery/PlutoFacilityNewsFlash.pdf
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Project_Pluto
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Supersonic_Low_Altitude_Missile

Excerpt from Ian Williams interview with Pete Baumgartner at RFERL:
RFE/RL: Was there anything that surprised you from the various missile and weapons programs that were announced today? Something that you hadn’t heard about before?
Williams: I think the nuclear-powered cruise missile is the one that is getting the most attention. I was a little shocked when they said “nuclear powered.” I thought they meant nuclear tipped, and then realized…they actually are talking about a nuclear-fueled cruise missile…. It’s actually not new technology, per se, the United States actually experimented with nuclear-powered missiles back in the 1960s…and it worked, but ultimately the intercontinental-ballistic missile…that technology became more attainable and was seen as being more practical and so we gave up on the long-range intercontinental cruise missile idea, but it is something that it looks like Russia has revived and brought back, which is quite interesting
.” Ian Williams, an associate fellow and associate director in the Center for Strategic and International Studies’ (CSIS) International Security Program, as interviewed by March 01, 2018 19:35 GMT, Pete Baumgartner: https://www.rferl.org/a/arms-expert-putin-weapons-look-like-overkill-question-and-answer/29071494.html



https://ntrs.nasa.gov/archive/nasa/casi.ntrs.nasa.gov/20140008805.pdf