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Litvinenko blamed Putin for his death by polonium poisoning, upon his deathbed:
You may succeed in silencing me but that silence comes at a price. You have shown yourself to be as barbaric and ruthless as your most hostile critics have claimed. You have shown yourself to have no respect for life, liberty or any civilised value. You have shown yourself to be unworthy of your office, to be unworthy of the trust of civilised men and women. You may succeed in silencing one man but the howl of protest from around the world will reverberate, Mr Putin, in your ears for the rest of your life. May God forgive you for what you have done, not only to me but to beloved Russia and its people.

Why wasn’t Russia severely punished then? This was before Putin grabbed part of the country of Georgia, and years before he stole Crimea from Ukraine. This was over 15 years before he launched a major assault upon Ukraine.

From the Litvinenko Inquiry:

The photo and the deathbed statement

3.140 On Tuesday 21 November 2006, a photographer visited UCH and took the photograph of Mr Litvinenko lying in his bed that became the iconic image of this case.175 I heard some evidence about the circumstances in which the photograph was taken.

3.141 Mr Goldfarb said that the idea for the photograph was his…

He said that Mr Litvinenko was “adamant” about, “letting the world know that he has been poisoned by the Kremlin”, and that he approved the idea of the photograph.176 Marina Litvinenko stated that she was against the idea because at that time she still hoped that Mr Litvinenko would survive, but she confirmed that Mr Litvinenko agreed both to the photograph being taken and to it being published.177

Lord Bell, whose agency arranged for the photograph to be taken, gave evidence before me. He recalled that Mr Litvinenko had been “particularly keen that people should see what had happened to him”, and that, to that end, he had pulled his hospital gown to one side when the photograph was taken so that all the medical equipment was visible.178

3.142 It was on the same day, 21 November, that Mr Litvinenko signed what has become known as his deathbed statement. On the day after Mr Litvinenko’s death, the statement was read to the media by Mr Goldfarb at a press conference held outside UCH, and was thereafter published widely.

3.143 The statement was short, and was in the following terms:
179

“I would like to thank many people. My doctors, nurses and hospital staff who are doing all they can for me; the British Police who are pursuing my case with rigour and professionalism and are watching over me and my family. I would like to thank the British Government for taking me under their care. I am honoured to be a British citizen.

I would like to thank the British public for their messages of support and for the interest they have shown in my plight.

I thank my wife, Marina, who has stood by me. My love for her and our son knows no bounds.

But as I lie here I can distinctly hear the beating of wings of the angel of death. I may be able to give him the slip but I have to say my legs do not run as fast as I would like. I think, therefore, that this may be the time to say one or two things to the person responsible for my present condition.

You may succeed in silencing me but that silence comes at a price. You have shown yourself to be as barbaric and ruthless as your most hostile critics have claimed.

You have shown yourself to have no respect for life, liberty or any civilised value.

You have shown yourself to be unworthy of your office, to be unworthy of the trust of civilised men and women.

You may succeed in silencing one man but the howl of protest from around the world will reverberate, Mr Putin, in your ears for the rest of your life.

May God forgive you for what you have done, not only to me but to beloved Russia and its people.” The statement was signed in manuscript by Mr Litvinenko, and dated 21 November 2006.

175 INQ019299 176 Goldfarb 5/155-156 177 Marina Litvinenko 4/66-67 178 Bell 6/22 179 INQ017399 The Litvinenko Inquiry” https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/the-litvinenko-inquiry-report-into-the-death-of-alexander-litvinenko


Why would Putin want Litvinenko dead?” BBC News https://youtu.be/u7ZUBP2rpiA

https://www.rferl.org/a/russia-litvinenko-investigation-poisoning/31471215.html

Alexei Navalny and the Long History of Poisoned Kremlin Critics