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The notorious University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, Baric Lab, which previously turned a bat coronavirus into a human coronavirus, which could cause an epidemic (and pandemic), and has been connected to the Wuhan Institute of Virology, claims to have “developed an mRNA vaccine that protected mice against a range of coronaviruses.” And, allegedly, “the results point the way toward a universal coronavirus vaccine that could prevent future pandemics” (NIH news release July 20, 2021)

Last October, the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, filed provisional patents for David R. Martinez and Ralph Baric, as co-inventors (US provisional application no. 63/106,247 filed on 27 October 2020) “for the chimeric vaccine constructs and their applications”. Martinez et al., Science 373, 991–998 (2021) 27 August 2021 https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/34214046/
Last October (2020) is when the Delta variant appears to have emerged in India.

SARS-CoV-2 has a “low mutation rate compared to influenza”. (Manzanares-Meza LD, Medina-Contreras O. “SARS-CoV-2 and influenza: a comparative overview and treatment implications”. Bol Med Hosp Infant Mex. 2020;77(5):262-273. https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/33064680/
Interesting. So, why has it mutated so quickly? Is it mutating naturally?

Facebook owner Zuckerberg, and his wife (Chan), were involved in the funding. It also included BioNTech funding. While BioNTech is the ostensible partner of Pfizer, the BioNTech mRNA vaccine Comirnaty was given a license, whereas Pfizer is still on an EUA.

Looks like more potential money for BioNTech investors Thomas and Andreas Struengmann who, because of the mRNA vaccine, are now the richest Germans. Their maternal grandfather was one of the German General Kruegers, almost certainly a Nazi, as their mother was born in 1922 and the details appear hidden. The Struengmann father was a (Lutheran) German doctor in the Nazi period, too. Daszak of EcoHealth Alliance’s Ukrainian father appears to have fought with the Nazi SS. Did Baric’s father fight with the Croatian SS? While one may not choose, the family into which one is born, one can help acting like them.

Funding-support includes by a Burroughs Wellcome Fund (Postdoctoral Enrichment Program Award); Hanna H. Gray Fellowship from the Howard Hugues Medical Institute; NIH NIAID T32 AI007151; NIAID F32 AI152296; Chan Zuckerberg Initiative; North Carolina Policy Collaboratory at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, with funding from the North Carolina Coronavirus Relief Fund established and appropriated by the North Carolina General Assembly; National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID), NIH, US Department of Health and Human Services awards U01 AI149644, U54 CA260543, AI157155, and AI110700; AI124429 and a BioNTech SRA; as well as an animal models contract from the NIH (HHSN272201700036I).

News Release excerpt:
Experimental vaccine protects against multiple coronaviruses, July 20, 2021
At a Glance
* By combining parts of spike proteins from different coronaviruses, researchers developed an mRNA vaccine that protected mice against a range of coronaviruses.
* The results point the way toward a universal coronavirus vaccine
that could prevent future pandemics…

Both SARS-CoV and SARS-CoV-2 are Sarbecoviruses. Bats harbor other Sarbecoviruses that could spread to humans and cause future pandemics. Thus, there is a need for a vaccine that could protect against a range of Sarbecoviruses. 

Some current vaccines against SARS-CoV-2, like the Pfizer and Moderna vaccines, are mRNA vaccines. These contain messenger RNA (mRNA) that directs the body’s cells to make a viral protein, which elicits an immune response. A team of researchers led by Drs. David Martinez and Ralph Baric at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill set out to design an mRNA vaccine that would be effective against several Sarbecoviruses.

NIH’s National Institute for Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID) and National Cancer Institute (NCI) supported the work. Results were described in Science on June 22, 2021…https://www.nih.gov/news-events/nih-research-matters/experimental-vaccine-protects-against-multiple-coronaviruses
They didn’t research the delta variant?

Covid-19 being designed-developed and/or made in the United States and escaping from the Wuhan lab can both be true. They aren’t mutually exclusive. On the contrary, US based researchers and Chinese from the Wuhan lab were all involved in Coronavirus research, which converted a bat coronavirus into one which could cause a human epidemic, and pandemic. While we believe that someone let Covid-19 out of a lab (or multiple labs), we don’t know who did it. Most of the researchers probably simply suffer from hubris, but all researchers connected to coronavirus research must be investigated – not just Fauci.

Many government funded researchers had a motive, as big, or bigger, than the pharmaceutical and biotech companies, for letting Covid-19 escape and spread. In short, they could be like the fireman who sets fires. That motive is now bigger due to all of the money thrown their way. Looks like a shakedown – let lose virus, demand money to study the virus and more money with patents.

It’s Gitmo time for many, before it’s too late for the rest of us.

In a research article “SARS-like WIV1-CoV poised for human emergence” by Vineet D. Menacherya, Boyd L. Yount Jr., et al., PNAS, pp. 3048–3053, March 15, 2016, vol. 113, no. 11 regarding biosafety and security and the Wuhan lab, it says: “Reported studies were initiated after the University of North Carolina Institutional Biosafety Committee approved the experimental protocol: project title: Generating infectious clones of Bat SARS-like CoVs; lab safety plan ID: 20145741; schedule G ID: 12279. These studies were initiated before the US Government Deliberative Process Research Funding Pause on Selected Gain of Function Research Involving Influenza, MERS, and SARS Viruses… Continuation of these studies has been requested and approved by the NIH”. They “thank Dr. Zhengli-Li Shi of the Wuhan Institute of Virology for access to bat CoV sequences and plasmid of WIV1-CoV spike protein.” https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4797993/. Vineet D. Menachery was the lead author and a key researcher for coronavirus experiments (2012-2015), which turned a bat coronavirus into a human coronavirus, which could cause an epidemic (and pandemic). However, Boyd L. Yount Jr., University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, “designed the infectious clone and recovered chimeric viruses.”(See: “A SARS-like cluster of circulating bat coronaviruses shows potential for human emergence” Nat Med: 2015 Dec;21(12):1508-13 https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/26552008/). (The origin of Menachery is India, the origin of this Yount is perhaps North Carolina Jund(t) from the Rhineland.)

North Carolina-Wuhan Coronavirus Creation & Galveston Lab Coronavirus Studies on Aging Mice and Men

The new paper excerpts (abstract and acknowledgments):
Chimeric spike mRNA vaccines protect against Sarbecovirus challenge in mice 2021 Jun 22;eabi4506. doi: 10.1126/science.abi4506. Online ahead of print. By David R Martinez  1 , Alexandra Schäfer  2 , Sarah R Leist  2 , Gabriela De la Cruz  3 , Ande West  2 , Elena N Atochina-Vasserman  4 , Lisa C Lindesmith  2 , Norbert Pardi  4 , Robert Parks  5 , Maggie Barr  5 , Dapeng Li  5 , Boyd Yount  2 , Kevin O Saunders  5 , Drew Weissman  4 , Barton F Haynes  5 , Stephanie A Montgomery  6 , Ralph S Baric  1
Affiliations collapse
Affiliations
* 1
Department of Epidemiology, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC, USA. david.rafael.martinez@gmail.com rbaric@email.unc.edu.
* 2
Department of Epidemiology, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC, USA.
* 3
Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of North Carolina School of Medicine, Chapel Hill, NC, USA.
* 4
Infectious Disease Division, Department of Medicine, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA, USA.
* 5
Duke Human Vaccine Institute, Duke University School of Medicine, Durham, NC, USA.
* 6
Department of Laboratory Medicine and Pathology, University of North Carolina School of Medicine, Chapel Hill, NC, USA.
* PMID: 34214046 DOI: 10.1126/science.abi4506
*
* Abstract
The emergence of SARS-CoV in 2003 and SARS-CoV-2 in 2019 highlights the need to develop universal vaccination strategies against the broader Sarbecovirus subgenus.

Using chimeric spike designs, we demonstrate protection against challenge from SARS-CoV, SARS-CoV-2, SARS-CoV-2 B.1.351, bat CoV (Bt-CoV) RsSHC014, and a heterologous Bt-CoV WIV-1 in vulnerable aged mice. Chimeric spike mRNAs induced high levels of broadly protective neutralizing antibodies against high-risk Sarbecoviruses. In contrast, SARS-CoV-2 mRNA vaccination not only showed a marked reduction in neutralizing titers against heterologous Sarbecoviruses, but SARS-CoV and WIV-1 challenge in mice resulted in breakthrough infections. Chimeric spike mRNA vaccines efficiently neutralized D614G, mink cluster five, and the UK B.1.1.7., and South African B.1.351 variants of concern. Thus, multiplexed-chimeric spikes can prevent SARS-like zoonotic coronavirus infections with pandemic potential.Copyright © 2021 The Authors, some rights reserved; exclusive licensee American Association for the Advancement of Science. No claim to original U.S. Government Works. Distributed under a Creative Commons Attribution License 4.0 (CC BY).

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
Funding: D.R.M. is currently supported by a Burroughs Wellcome Fund Postdoctoral Enrichment Program Award and a Hanna H. Gray Fellowship from the Howard Hugues Medical Institute and was supported by an NIH NIAID T32 AI007151 and an NIAID F32 AI152296.

This research was also supported by funding from the Chan Zuckerberg Initiative awarded to R.S.B.

This project was supported by the North Carolina Policy Collaboratory at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, with funding from the North Carolina Coronavirus Relief Fund established and appropriated by the North Carolina General Assembly.

This project was funded in part by the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID), NIH, US Department of Health and Human Services awards U01 AI149644, U54 CA260543, AI157155, and AI110700 to R.S.B.; AI124429 and a BioNTech SRA to D.W. and E.N.A.-V.; as well as an animal models contract from the NIH (HHSN272201700036I).

Animal histopathology services were performed by the Animal Histopathology and Laboratory Medicine Core at the University of North Carolina, which is supported in part by an NCI Center Core Support Grant (5P30CA016086-41) to the UNC Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center.

We thank B. L. Mui and Y. K. Tam from Acuitas Therapeutics, Vancouver, BC V6T 1Z3, Canada, for supplying the LNPs. Author contributions: D.R.M. and R.S.B.conceived the study. D.R.M. and R.S.B. designed experiments. D.R.M., A.S., S.R.L., and A.W. performed laboratory experiments. N.P. and K.O.S. provided critical reagents. D.R.M., A.S., S.R.L., G.D.l.C., A.W., E.N.A.-V., L.C.L., N.P., R.P., M.B., D.L., B.Y., K.O.S., D.W., B.F.H., and S.A.M. analyzed data and provided critical insight. D.R.M. wrote the first draft of the paper. D.R.M., A.S., S.R.L., G.D.l.C., A.W., E.N.A.-V., L.C.L., N.P., N.P., R.P., M.B., D.L., B.Y., K.O.S., D.W., B.F.H., S.A.M., and R.S.B. read and edited the paper.

Funding acquisition: D.R.M. and R.S.B. All authors reviewed and approved the manuscript. Competing interests: The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill has filed provisional patents for which D.R.M. and R.S.B. are co-inventors (US provisional application no. 63/106,247 filed on 27 October 2020) for the chimeric vaccine constructs and their applications described in this study.

Data and materials availability: The amino acid sequences of the chimeric spike constructs are included in table S1. mRNA sequences are deposited in GenBank with the following accession nos: chimera 1, MZ393687; chimera 2, MZ393688; chimera 3, MZ393689; and chimera 4, MZ393690. Materials generated as part of this study are available from R.S.B.upon request.

This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International (CC BY 4.0) license, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. To view a copy of this license, visit https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/. This license does not apply to figures/photos/artwork or other content included in the article that is credited to a third party; obtain authorization from the rights holder before using such material.

SUPPLEMENTARY MATERIALS

science.sciencemag.org/content/373/6558/991/suppl/DC1 Materials and Methods Figs. S1 to S7 Table S1 References (41–43) MDAR Reproducibility Checklist

11 March 2021; accepted 15 June 2021 10.1126/science.abi4506

Martinez et al., Science 373, 991–998 (2021) 27 August 2021 8 of 8 https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/34214046/
We have yet to read the paper itself.

Related:

NC Research Triangle-UC Davis: Wuhan Lab Connections; Chinese Military Researchers; Quarantining Rural Americans

US NIAID Funded Baric-Shi “Gain of Function” Research Featured in Fauci FOIA Emails Built Upon Mouse “Gain of Function” Virus Created By the NIAID, the CDC and UNC-Chapel Hill; Fauci Head of NIAID Since 1983

US Senator Blackburn & Colleagues Demand Answers from Big Tech re Censorship of Covid-19 Origins; Chan-Zuckerberg Gave $433,000 Grant to Wuhan (WIV) Collaborationist Baric’s Lab

The Fauci/COVID-19 Dossier: Exposes Fauci-Baric et al.; Commercial Actors (Over 5100 Patents-Patent Applications Related to SARS Coronavirus)

Full news release:
July 20, 2021
Experimental vaccine protects against multiple coronaviruses
At a Glance
* By combining parts of spike proteins from different coronaviruses, researchers developed an mRNA vaccine that protected mice against a range of coronaviruses.
* The results point the way toward a universal coronavirus vaccine that could prevent future pandemics.

Three pathogenic coronaviruses have emerged in the past two decades: the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV), the Middle East Respiratory Syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV), and SARS-CoV-2, which causes COVID-19. Both SARS-CoV and SARS-CoV-2 are Sarbecoviruses. Bats harbor other Sarbecoviruses that could spread to humans and cause future pandemics. Thus, there is a need for a vaccine that could protect against a range of Sarbecoviruses. 

Some current vaccines against SARS-CoV-2, like the Pfizer and Moderna vaccines, are mRNA vaccines. These contain messenger RNA (mRNA) that directs the body’s cells to make a viral protein, which elicits an immune response. A team of researchers led by Drs. David Martinez and Ralph Baric at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill set out to design an mRNA vaccine that would be effective against several Sarbecoviruses.

NIH’s National Institute for Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID) and National Cancer Institute (NCI) supported the work. Results were described in Science on June 22, 2021.

Sarbecoviruses attach to host cells using a protein on their surfaces called the spike protein. Current SARS-CoV-2 vaccines use the spike protein to elicit an immune response. The team hypothesized that a spike protein made with parts from different viruses would elicit a broad immune response. So, they mixed three parts—the receptor-binding domain (RBD), the N-terminal domain (NTD), and subunit 2 (S2)—from various Sarbecoviruses into single spike protein “chimeras.” They created four such chimeras using different combinations of RBD, NTD, and S2.

The researchers immunized aged mice with various combinations of mRNA encoding these spike chimeras. They also immunized mice with a vaccine containing only SARS-CoV-2 spike mRNA for comparison. Both groups of mice produced potent neutralizing antibodies against SARS-CoV-2. They also produced antibodies against the alpha and beta variants of concern.

Mice that received all four chimeras also produced antibodies against SARS-CoV, bat viruses, and additional SARS-CoV-2 variants of concern. These antibody responses were comparable to, or better than, those generated against SARS-CoV-2. In contrast, mice that received only the SARS-CoV-2 vaccine had little or no antibody response to the other viruses.

To assess whether the mice were protected against diverse viruses, the team exposed them to SARS-CoV and bat coronaviruses. Mice vaccinated with the chimeras had no detectable virus in their lungs and no lung damage. In contrast, mice vaccinated with the SARS-CoV-2 spike developed breakthrough lung infections and weight loss when challenged with other viruses.

These results suggest that a universal Sarbecovirus vaccine may be possible. The team hopes that further testing will lead to human clinical trials of a chimeric spike mRNA vaccine next year.

“Our findings look bright for the future because they suggest we can design more universal pan-coronavirus vaccines to proactively guard against viruses we know are at risk for emerging in humans,” Martinez says. “With this strategy, perhaps we can prevent a SARS-CoV-3.”
—by Brian Doctrow, Ph.D.
https://www.nih.gov/news-events/nih-research-matters/experimental-vaccine-protects-against-multiple-coronaviruses