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Biden’s DOJ prosecutors asked a judge to drop the cases against four researchers at California universities charged with hiding their ties to the Chinese military. Even the LA Times describes this as “a blow to U.S. efforts to battle Beijing’s attempts to steal U.S. national security and business secrets”. Thursday, July 22, 2021, charges were dropped against Juan Tang “a cancer researcher at UC Davis who had been accused of lying on a visa application about having served in the Chinese military.” Then, on Friday, July 23, 2021, Biden’s prosecutors asked for the charges to be dismissed in “three similar cases…against researchers who worked at Stanford University, UC San Francisco and UCLA.” The lawyers working for Juan Tang “claimed that she had worked as a civilian cancer researcher at a Chinese military medical facility”. They also claimed that she “had disclosed this information to UC Davis”. See: “U.S. prosecutors move to drop cases against Chinese researchers” By Leila Miller, Del Quentin Wilber, LA Times, July 23, 2021 https://archive.md/geFZ4
If true, who did she disclose it to at UC Davis? Who did she work with/for at UC Davis? USAID PI JK Mazet of UC Davis is one of the central actors in the Daszak-Wuhan Lab-Covid-19 scandal.

See more here: https://nackpets.wordpress.com/2021/07/25/doj-drops-cases-against-five-visiting-chinese-researchers-accused-of-lying-about-ties-to-china-military

Juan Tang, and the others, were on J-1 visas, which is supposed to be a cultural exchange visa and is apparently widely abused, including schemes to import foreigners to teach in US public school systems. Xin “Wang’s visa application stated that the purpose of his visit was to conduct scientific research at the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF).  Wang is alleged to have made fraudulent statements on this visa application.  Specifically, Wang stated that he had served as an Associate Professor in Medicine in the People’s Liberation Army (PLA), from September 1, 2002 through September 1, 2016. In reality,… he was, in fact, still currently a “Level 9” technician in the PLA, employed by a military university lab…. Wang was still employed by the PLA while he was studying in the United States, and he made false statements about his military service in his visa application in order to increase the likelihood that he would receive his J1 visa…. Wang provided information to CBP that he had been instructed by his supervisor, the director of his military university lab in the PRC, to observe the layout of the UCSF lab and bring back information on how to replicate it in China.  Wang similarly told his supervising UCSF professor that he had duplicated some of the work of that professor at the lab in China.  Some of the work of the UCSF lab was funded by grants from the United States Department of Health and Human Services, National Institutes of Health (NIH). 
Wang was arrested on June 7, and had his initial appearance on June 8.  A grand jury in the Northern District of California returned an indictment on June 22… A grand jury in the Northern District of California returned an indictment on June 22..
” According to the affidavit Chen Song “was a member of the PLA when she entered and while she was in the United States, and that the hospital she listed on her visa as her employer was a cover for her true employer, the PLA.  The affidavit identifies four research articles that she co-authored, which described her as affiliated with institutions subordinate to the PLA Air Force.”
(DOJ Press Release, August 6, 2020)

Top Recipients of NIH Funding, 2019
1. Johns Hopkins University: $763,565,791
2. UC San Francisco: $684,499,764
3. University of Michigan: $591,487,816
4. University of Pennsylvania: $582,337,151
5. Duke University: $571,409,121
6. University of Pittsburgh: $546,388,511
7. University of Washington: $526,962,825
8. Stanford University: $526,216,444
9. Washington University $523,835,750
11. University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill: $509,869,004

NIH funding is also, at least in part, behind many of the more than 1,440 patents and 1,988 inventions that UCSF has produced and are still in active use to this day. The revenue that these discoveries generate accounts for 20 percent of royalty income within the UC system.” See: “UCSF Remains Top Public Recipient of NIH Funding for 13th Straight Year” By Jason Alvarez, UCSF News, April 1, 2020 https://archive.is/3aBOu

One year ago:
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE Thursday, July 23, 2020
Researchers Charged with Visa Fraud After Lying About Their Work for China’s People’s Liberation Army
China’s San Francisco Consulate Harboring Known Fugitive from Justice

Four individuals have recently been charged with visa fraud in connection with a scheme to lie about their status as members of the People’s Republic of China’s military forces, the People’s Liberation Army (PLA), while in the United States conducting research.  Three of these individuals have been arrested and the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) is seeking the fourth who is a fugitive from justice currently being harbored at the Chinese Consulate in San Francisco.

In addition to these arrests, the FBI has recently conducted additional interviews of visa holders suspected of having undeclared affiliation with the Chinese military in more than 25 American cities.

“These members of China’s People Liberation Army applied for research visas while hiding their true affiliation with the PLA,” said Assistant Attorney General for National Security John C. Demers.  “This is another part of the Chinese Communist Party’s plan to take advantage of our open society and exploit academic institutions.  We will continue to conduct this investigation together with the FBI.”

“The United States welcomes students, academics, and researchers from across the globe. Today’s announcement shows the extreme lengths to which the Chinese government has gone to infiltrate and exploit America’s benevolence,” said John Brown, Executive Assistant Director of the FBI’s National Security Branch. “In interviews with members of the Chinese People’s Liberation Army in over 25 cities across the U.S., the FBI uncovered a concerted effort to hide their true affiliation to take advantage of the United States and the American people.” 

Each defendant has been charged with visa fraud, in violation of 18 U.S.C. § 1546(a).  If convicted, each faces a maximum statutory penalty of 10 years in prison and a fine of $250,000.  The allegations against each are as follows:

Xin WANG

According to a complaint that was unsealed in the Northern District of California, on June 8, 2020 and court documents filed June 11, Wang entered the United States on March 26, 2019, after receiving a J1 non-immigrant visa in December of 2018.  Wang’s visa application stated that the purpose of his visit was to conduct scientific research at the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF).  Wang is alleged to have made fraudulent statements on this visa application.  Specifically, Wang stated that he had served as an Associate Professor in Medicine in the People’s Liberation Army (PLA), from September 1, 2002 through September 1, 2016.

In reality, when interviewed by officers of Customs and Border Protection (CBP) at LAX on June 7, Wang provided information that he was, in fact, still currently a “Level 9” technician in the PLA, employed by a military university lab.  CBP officers also obtained information that this roughly corresponded with the rank of Major. 

According to court documents, Wang was still employed by the PLA while he was studying in the United States, and he made false statements about his military service in his visa application in order to increase the likelihood that he would receive his J1 visa. 

Also according to court documents, Wang provided information to CBP that he had been instructed by his supervisor, the director of his military university lab in the PRC, to observe the layout of the UCSF lab and bring back information on how to replicate it in China.  Wang similarly told his supervising UCSF professor that he had duplicated some of the work of that professor at the lab in China.  Some of the work of the UCSF lab was funded by grants from the United States Department of Health and Human Services, National Institutes of Health (NIH). 
Wang was arrested on June 7, and had his initial appearance on June 8.  A grand jury in the Northern District of California returned an indictment on June 22.

Juan TANG

According to court documents unsealed in the Eastern District of California on July 20, Tang, a researcher at the University of California at Davis, applied for a non-immigrant J1 visa on or about Oct. 28, 2019.  The visa was issued in November 2019, and Tang entered the United States on or about Dec. 27, 2019.  Tang is alleged to have made fraudulent statements on her visa application.  Specifically, to the question, “Have you ever served in the military,” Tang responded “No.”

In fact, Tang is a uniformed officer of the PLA Air Force (PLAAF).  As set forth in the Complaint, the FBI found a photograph of Tang in a military uniform and references to Tang’s employment at the Air Force Military Medical University, which has also been known as the Fourth Military Medical University.  The FBI interviewed Tang on June 20.  Although Tang denied having been a member of the military, an additional photograph of Tang in a different PLA military uniform was found on electronic media seized pursuant to a search warrant.

The FBI is seeking to arrest Tang pursuant to an Arrest Warrant and Complaint that were filed on June 26, and unsealed on July 20.  Tang has sought refuge at the Chinese consulate in San Francisco, where she remains.

Chen SONG

The allegations describing the crime appear in an affidavit supporting the complaint filed on July 17 and unsealed in the Northern District of California on July 20.  According to the affidavit, Song, 38, a Chinese national, applied for a J1 nonimmigrant visa in November 2018.  She entered the United States on Dec. 23, 2018.  In her visa application, in response to the question, “Have you ever served in the military,” Song stated that she had served in the Chinese military only from Sept. 1, through June 30, 2011.  She further stated that her employer was “Xi Diaoyutai Hospital.” Song described herself in her visa application as a neurologist who was coming to the U.S. to conduct research at Stanford University related to brain disease.

The affidavit alleges that these were lies, that Song was a member of the PLA when she entered and while she was in the United States, and that the hospital she listed on her visa as her employer was a cover for her true employer, the PLA.  The affidavit identifies four research articles that she co-authored, which described her as affiliated with institutions subordinate to the PLA Air Force. 

Specifically, the articles list Song as affiliated with the Air Force General Hospital in Beijing and the Fourth Military Medical University.  In addition, as of July 13, a Chinese health care website listed Song as an attending physician of the Department of Neurology of the PLA Air Force General Hospital, and included a photograph of Song wearing what appears to be a military uniform.  Further, an article published in 2015 identifies Song as the doctor at the PLA Air Force hospital who performed the autopsy on the former chief physician of the MRI Department at the hospital. 

Finally, according to the affidavit, a search of Song’s external hard drive, recovered pursuant to a court-authorized search warrant, found that, on June 21, Song had deleted a folder titled, in Chinese, “2018 Visiting School Important Information.”  The search recovered deleted documents from this folder.  The affidavit alleges that one of the recovered documents was a letter from Song to the Chinese Consulate in New York, explaining that she was extending her time in the United States for another year, and wrote that her stated employer, Beijing Xi Diaoyutai Hospital, is a false front, which is why she had obtained approval for her extension from the PLA Air Force and FMMU.  The letter further allegedly explained that, as these Chinese military approval documents were classified, she could not transmit them online.
Song was arrested on July 18.  

Kaikai ZHAO 

According to a complaint filed in the Southern District of Indiana on July 17 and unsealed today, Zhao, a graduate student studying machine learning and artificial intelligence at Indiana University, applied for an F1 nonimmigrant visa in June 2018.  In response to the question on the visa application, “Have you ever served in the military,” Zhao answered, “No.”  As set forth in the Complaint, Zhao served in the National University of Defense Technology, the PLA’s premier institution for scientific research and education, which is directly subordinate to the PRC’s Central Military Commission.  Zhao also attended the Aviation University of Air Force (AUAF), which is a Chinese military academy analogous to the U.S. Air Force Academy.  AUAF students are active military service members who receive military training.  In addition, the FBI located an online photograph of Zhao wearing a PLAAF uniform.
Zhao was arrested on July 18.
Topic(s): 
Counterintelligence and Export Control
National Security
Component(s): 
National Security Division (NSD)
USAO – California, Eastern
USAO – California, Northern
USAO – Indiana, Southern
Press Release Number: 
20-685
Updated July 23, 2020
https://www.justice.gov/opa/pr/researchers-charged-visa-fraud-after-lying-about-their-work-china-s-people-s-liberation-army

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Thursday, August 6, 2020
Former U.C. Davis Researcher Charged with Visa Fraud and Making False Statements
SACRAMENTO, Calif. — A federal grand jury returned a two-count indictment today against Juan Tang, 37, of Xi’an, China, charging her with visa fraud and making false statements to the FBI, U.S. Attorney McGregor W. Scott announced.

Arraignment is set for Aug. 10 at 2:00 PM before U.S. Magistrate Judge Edmund F. Brennan.

According to court documents, Tang is alleged to have possessed a non-immigrant J-1 visa that she obtained by making false statements during the application process about her military service. When later interviewed by FBI agents, Tang also made false statements about her military service. Specifically, it is alleged that Tang is a current member of the Chinese military and falsely claimed that she had not served in the military.

This case is the product of an investigation by the Federal Bureau of Investigation with assistance from the U.S. Department of State’s Diplomatic Security Service, San Francisco Field Office. Assistant U.S. Attorney Heiko P. Coppola is prosecuting the case.

If convicted of visa fraud, Tang faces a maximum statutory penalty of 10 years in prison and a $250,000 fine. If convicted of making false statements, Tang faces a maximum statutory penalty of 5 years in prison and a $250,000 fine. Any sentence, however, would be determined at the discretion of the court after consideration of any applicable statutory factors and the Federal Sentencing Guidelines, which take into account a number of variables. The charges are only allegations; the defendant is presumed innocent until and unless proven guilty beyond a reasonable doubt.
Attachment(s): 
Download Tang_indictment.pdf
https://www.justice.gov/usao-edca/press-release/file/1302081/download
Component(s): 
USAO – California, Eastern
Press Release Number: 
2:20-cr-134 JAM
https://www.justice.gov/usao-edca/pr/former-uc-davis-researcher-charged-visa-fraud-and-making-false-statements

Click to access gov.uscourts.caed.377002.213.0.pdf

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Thursday, June 11, 2020
Officer of China’s People’s Liberation Army Arrested At Los Angeles International Airport
Defendant Charged with Visa Fraud, Arrested At Airport While Planning To Leave the United States
SAN FRANCISCO – Xin Wang, a scientific researcher and officer with the People’s Republic of China’s (PRC) People’s Liberation Army (PLA), was arrested at Los Angeles International Airport (LAX) while attempting to depart the United States for Tianjin, China, and was charged with visa fraud, announced United States Attorney David L. Anderson and Federal Bureau of Investigation Special Agent in Charge John F. Bennett.
According to court documents filed today and a complaint which was unsealed on Monday, Wang entered the United States on March 26, 2019, after receiving a multiple entry J1 non-immigrant visa in December of 2018.  Wang’s visa application stated that the purpose of his visit was to conduct scientific research at the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF).  Wang is alleged to have made fraudulent statements on this visa application.  Specifically, in his visa application, Wang stated that he had served as an Associate Professor in Medicine in the PLA, from September 1, 2002 through September 1, 2016.
In reality, when interviewed by officers of Customs and Border Protection (CBP) at LAX on June 7, 2020, Wang provided information that he was, in fact, still currently a “Level 9” technician in the PLA, employed by a military university lab.  CBP officers also obtained information that this roughly corresponded with the level of Major, and that Wang had received compensation from the PLA and the China Scholarship Council—in addition to compensation from UCSF—while in the United States.  According to court documents, Wang was still employed by the PLA while he was studying in the United States and he made false statements about his military service in his visa application in order to increase the likelihood that he would receive his J1 visa. 
Also according to court documents, Wang provided information to CBP that he had been instructed by his supervisor, the director of his military university lab in the PRC, to observe the layout of the UCSF lab and bring back information on how to replicate it in China.  CBP received information that Wang had studies from UCSF with him which he was taking to share with his PLA colleagues, and he had sent research to his lab in China via email.  Wang similarly told his supervising UCSF professor that he had duplicated some of the work of that professor at the lab in China.  Some of the work of the UCSF lab was funded by grants from the United States Department of Health and Human Services, National Institutes of Health (NIH).  Wang also wiped his personal phone of WeChat messaging content earlier the morning he arrived at LAX.
Wang is charged with visa fraud, in violation of 18 U.S.C. § 1546(a).  If convicted, he faces a maximum statutory penalty of ten years in prison and a fine of $250,000. 
Wang made his initial appearance on Monday, June 8, 2020, in the Central District of California before Magistrate Judge Jacqueline Chooljian, and was detained for further proceedings.  His next appearance is scheduled for Friday, June 12, 2020, at 10 a.m., before Judge Chooljian, for a detention hearing.
The case is being prosecuted by the Special Prosecutions Section of the U.S. Attorney’s Office.  The case is being investigated by the FBI.
Attachment(s): 
Download Wang Complaint https://www.justice.gov/usao-ndca/press-release/file/1284701/download
Topic(s): 
Immigration
Intellectual Property
Component(s): 
USAO – California, Northern
Updated June 11, 2020
https://www.justice.gov/usao-ndca/pr/officer-china-s-people-s-liberation-army-arrested-los-angeles-international-airport

From the FBI testimony by Patrick Fogerty: “WANG was issued a multiple entry J1 non-immigrant visa on December 17, 2018. The visa application stated that he was employed by the Air Force Military University and the purpose of his visit was to conduct research at the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF). In his visa application, he stated that he had previously served as an Associate Professor in Medicine in the Chinese Army, also known as the People’s Liberation Army (PLA). His listed dates of service for the army were from September 1, 2002 through September 1, 2016. On March 26, 2019, WANG entered the United States through San Francisco International Airport. 8. On June 7, 2020, WANG was interviewed by Customs and Border Protection (CBP) at the Los Angeles International Airport upon at attempt to depart the United States for Tianjin, China. During this interview, he stated that he was currently a “Level 9” technician within the PLA, had received a scholarship from the China Scholarship Council and had received a stipend from the PLA while he was studying in the United States. In addition, WANG stated that he intentionally made false statements about his military service in his visa application in order to increase the likelihood that he would receive his J1 visa. 9. Based upon the foregoing, my training and experience, and the training and experience of agents and investigators involved in this investigation, I believe that there is probable cause to believe that WANG has committed the crime of fraud and misuse of visas in violation of Title 18, United States Code Section 1546(a)” Case 3:20-mj-70720-MAG Document 1 Filed 06/08/20 https://www.justice.gov/usao-ndca/press-release/file/1284701/download