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Nothing like this had been done in the country. White people didn’t think black people could afford it. [But] They set records on paying mortgages. — Rosa Kellerhttps://cat.xula.edu/unmasked/articles/419/

The aim used to be for all Americans to live well. This meant access to single family homes. Ponchartrain Park was a first step in the right direction.

Developed in the 1950s, “Pontchartrain Park attracted middle- and upper-class African-American residents and became a symbol that the American Dream could be a reality for all Americans….”https://prcno.org/resources/pontchartrain-park/

Instead of aspiring for a good life for all Americans, the Biden Administration aims to undermine single family zoning so that no one can have the opportunity to live well.

Comment deadline July 12, 2021: “FR-6249-I-01 Restoring Affirmatively Furthering Fair Housing Definitions and Certifications Posted by the Department of Housing and Urban Development on Jun 10, 2021https://www.regulations.gov/document/HUD-2021-0031-0001 The Trump Administration Rule from last year outlines problems with the previous rule(s), which the Biden Admin plans to reinstate. Even it appears rather open-ended – leaving too much to the discretion of a particular administration. “RULE FR-6228-F-01 Preserving Community and Neighborhood Choice: HUD has reexamined the 2015 AFFH rule and the definition of AFFH Posted Aug 7, 2020 ID HUD-2020-0053-0001“. https://www.regulations.gov/document/HUD-2020-0053-0001 More: https://miningawareness.wordpress.com/2021/07/02/biden-admin-plot-to-push-poor-from-cities-into-isolated-high-density-suburban-housing-by-classifying-single-family-zoning-as-exclusionary-regulations-comment-deadline-july-12th/

The aim used to be for all Americans to live well. This meant access to single family homes. Ponchartrain Park was a first step in the right direction. Instead of aspiring to the good life for all, the Biden Administration aims to undermine single family zoning so that no one can have the opportunity to live well.

While, of course, the lifestyle of an apartment or condo may be right for some people who like communal living and don’t want to do lawn (or house) upkeep, there should be a choice. There should be urban apartments and suburban-rural homes.

The current shortage of affordable housing is caused by US immigration policy, which causes shortages both directly and indirectly (by loss of jobs and undercutting wages). It is not caused by single family zoning, as the Dems now allege. The Dems-Biden are pretending that single family zoning is “exclusionary”, which they apparently then conflate with “discriminatory”. And, the Biden Admin-Dems make clear that they aren’t speaking about social class, but rather race and ethnicity. In short, the assumptions of the Biden Admin and the Dems are racist and addled.

As can be seen in the video, Ponchartrain Park today is both de facto and de jure integrated. It is now listed in the National Historic Register: https://www.nps.gov/subjects/nationalregister/weekly-list-20200626.htm

Pontchartrain Park National Recognition https://youtu.be/0ncxW3KOUP0

Pontchartrain Park: TRICENTENNIAL MOMENT “https://youtu.be/MrqVZX7EDyE

Houses in Pontchartrain Park would share the appearance and amenities of the adjacent Gentilly Woods, then a whites-only community.” https://prcno.org/pontchartrain-park-neighborhood-named-national-register-historic-places/

The History and Politics behind Pontchartrain Park: Pontchartrain Park, built between 1955 and 1961, was one of the first suburban-style subdivisions developed for African Americans in the segregated South. Located in the Gentilly neighborhood, where many affluent white residents were moving at the time, Pontchartrain Park attracted middle- and upper-class African-American residents and became a symbol that the American Dream could be a reality for all Americans….”https://prcno.org/resources/pontchartrain-park/

Rosa Keller was a true philanthropist and not a fake philanthropist like found today. She was a Christian Coca-cola heiress who married a Jewish man. She has said that the treatment of Jewish people made her sympathetic to the plight of African Americans: “In 1947, seeking to alleviate the housing shortage for New Orleans’s black families, Rosa and Charles Keller, along with friends and philanthropists Edith and Edgar Stern, financed the construction of Pontchartrain Park, one of the first middle-class black communities in the country.” See: “Rosa Keller: Rosa Freeman Keller spent her life fighting for equal rights for all New Orleans citizens, including the desegregation of the New Olreans public transportation system, school system, and libraries”. By Shannon Frystak https://64parishes.org/entry/rosa-keller

It seems that she was a very very great lady: “Rosa F. Keller (NC ’32)”, By Beth Chauvin, Mar 05, 2021 https://64parishes.org/entry/rosa-keller

Pontchartrain Park neighborhood named to the National Register of Historic Places Preservation Resource Center”, July 9, 2020 https://prcno.org/pontchartrain-park-neighborhood-named-national-register-historic-places/

From Wikipedia:
Pontchartrain Park is a neighborhood of the city of New Orleans. A subdistrict of the Gentilly District Area, its boundaries as defined by the City Planning Commission are: Leon C. Simon Drive to the north, the Industrial Canal to the east, Dreux Avenue to the south and Peoples Avenue to the west.

Pontchartrain Park is located at 30°01′19″N 90°02′25″W [1] and has an elevation of 0 feet (0.0 m).[2] According to the United States Census Bureau, the district has a total area of 1.00 square mile (2.6 km2). 0.93 square miles (2.4 km2) of which is land and 0.07 square miles (0.2 km2) (7.0%) of which is water.

Pontchartrain Park includes a senior center, a golf course designed by famed African American golf course designer Joseph Bartholomew and the Major League Baseball Urban Youth Academy located at Wesley Barrow Stadium. Adjacent to the Pontchartrain Park golf course is the campus of Southern University at New Orleans.

Adjacent Neighborhoods
* Gentilly Woods (south)
* Lake Terrace/Lake Oaks (north)
* Milneburg (west)
* Pines Village (east)

Boundaries

The City Planning Commission defines the boundaries of Pontchartrain Park as these streets: Leon C. Simon Drive, the Industrial Canal, Dreux Avenue and Peoples Avenue.[3]

Demographics
As of the census of 2000, there were 2,630 people, 1,009 households, and 736 families residing in the neighborhood.[4] The population density was 2,828 /mi2 (1,096 /km2). As of the census of 2010, there were 1,482 people, 551 households, and 385 families residing in the neighborhood.[4]

History

Pontchartrain Park was developed after World War II. It was one of the first suburban-style subdivisions developed for middle class African Americans during the Jim Crow era of racial segregation in Louisiana.

It has been home to such prominent New Orleanians as mayors Dutch Morial and Marc Morial, political activist Philip M. Baptiste and district attorney Eddie Jordan; as well as nationally known figures such as Lisa P. Jackson, EPA Administrator under President Barack Obama, actor Wendell Pierce, and jazz musician Terrence Blanchard.

In the 1970s, urban renewal projects were undertaken with funding from the federal New Town Program.

Pontchartrain Park flooded badly in the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina in 2005, taking on water first from the overtopping of a section of floodwall of the Industrial Canal caused by storm surge channeled into the city from the MRGO Canal, then from major breaches sustained by floodwalls along the London Avenue Canal.

Notable residents
* Terrence Blanchard
* Lisa P. Jackson
* Eddie Jordan
* Dutch Morial
* Marc Morial
* Wendell Pierce
* Darryl Willis[5]
* Gustave Blache III

See also
* New Orleans neighborhoods
* Gentilly, New Orleans
References
1. ^ “US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990”. United States Census Bureau. 2011-02-12. Retrieved 2011-04-23.
2. ^ “US Board on Geographic Names”. United States Geological Survey. 2007-10-25. Retrieved 2008-01-31.
3. ^ Greater New Orleans Community Data Center. “Pontchartrain Park Neighborhood”. Retrieved 2008-06-21.
4. ^ Jump up to: 
a b “Pontchartrain Park Neighborhood”. Greater New Orleans Community Data Center. Retrieved 6 January 2012.
5. ^ Rioux, Paul, West Bank bureau (2010-06-27). “New Orleans native gives BP a friendlier face”. NOLA.com. Archived from the original on 2013-04-11. Retrieved 2010-07-10.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pontchartrain_Park,_New_Orleans https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikipedia:Text_of_Creative_Commons_Attribution-ShareAlike_3.0_Unported_License