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If Democrats don’t recall that it is still citizens who vote them in or out and not non-citizens, they will lose in November. Some Republicans remember their fellow citizens.

Republican Senator McSally pleaded in the Senate: “It is simply a seven-day extension of the expanded unemployment benefits, while we continue to work out our differences. Who could possibly be against this?” Pelosi just told the media: “What are you going to do in a week?

U.S. Senator Martha McSally (R-AZ), “spoke on the Senate floor and called on Congress to pass a simple seven-day extension of expanded unemployment benefits while Congress finishes negotiations on the next coronavirus relief package.

“I’m asking Senators to simply extend expanded unemployment benefits for seven days while Congress comes up with a solution,” McSally said. “With the first of August approaching, Americans out of work are counting on us for cash so they can pay their rent and put food on the table for their families.https://www.mcsally.senate.gov/news/press-releases/mcsally-calls-for-7-day-extension-of-expanded-unemployment-benefits

Unemployed workers should not be left in limbo while Congress continues to negotiate the next relief package,” Senator Romney said. “Our solution extends the supplemental benefits for three months and incentivizes states to update their UI processing systems. We should act with urgency to help the millions of Americans who are on the verge of losing these additional benefits.” https://www.romney.senate.gov/romney-collins-mcsally-introduce-extension-stop-disruption-unemployment-benefits

The Trump administration also suggested a week extension.

Democrats Pelosi and Schumer have refused temporary extensions of expanded unemployment insurance (UI) – whether for a week or months. Rather, they are allowing some Americans to starve by their belligerent efforts to force many related and unrelated matters through, which they have known for months are unacceptable to the Republican Senate and to the average American.

Pelosi’s bill is over 1800 pages long. It includes something about cannabis banking; letting most prisoners out (due to being over 50, under 18, or common ailments); letting illegals work without penalty to their employer or themselves; forcing the census to be quickly processed although it started late; forcing US House apportionment to count non-citizens even though it means citizens will lose their representatives, and legal and illegal immigrants gain them; giving Covid stimulus to non-Americans, and continuing with the unemployment bonus that exceeds earnings of those still working on the frontline. Also, the Jabara-Heyer NO HATE Act, additional immigration matters and much more stuffed in a three trillion dollars bill. See: HR 6800 https://www.congress.gov/bill/116th-congress/house-bill/6800/text
Update: It seems that the Census is moving quickly anyway: https://2020census.gov/en/news-events/operational-adjustments-covid-19.html

By not approving the extension there may be a time-lag even if renewed. Those who received more than their normal income with benefits and saved it are ok for now. Those who didn’t are in trouble. Those who earned the same or more should have paid rent, but some didn’t, which also is causing grief to independent small landlords. Some seniors are dependent upon rental income.

Whenever there is a pending presidential election the Democrats go into immigrant first full stupid mode, whereas Republicans start remembering, a bit, that they represent Americans.

It seems likely that Republicans are willing compromise, for their more complete bill, as they proposed $200 per week in their bill and mid-way between $600 and $200 is $400 per week, which is estimated to be closer to 100% earnings for the majority, when combined with state unemployment.

Dem-wit US House Speaker Pelosi said : “Well, I don’t agree with you that cannabis is not related to this. This is a therapy that has proven successful

Q: Last night, White House Chief of Staff Mark Meadows offered you a one week extension of unemployment benefits at $600, which you rejected. And after that, he called you a politically-motivated party that won’t take yes for an answer. Can you explain why you rejected it and also your reaction to his comment?
Speaker Pelosi…. This is serious. This is life and death.
When you have a six day – one week extension on a provision, it’s usually – it has always been to accommodate the legislative process. If you’re on the verge of having an agreement or you have an agreement… So, a week would be a time for that, if you have a bill. What are we going to do in a week? What are we going to do in a week? What are you going to do in a week?
https://web.archive.org/web/20200802052538/https://www.speaker.gov/newsroom/73120-0
Even one week more would be better than nothing.

Our biggest concern is a) while Americans stay home, illegal and legal immigrants will take their jobs. Some, such as lawn care, are low risk for Covid and relatively good working class jobs. This would be facilitated by Pelosi’s proposed temporary amnesty. Also b) that some people have taken the extra money to vacation and/or protest and spread Covid. If unemployed people aren’t staying home, then it defeats the purpose of closing things. Plus there is (c) fairness: “unemployed janitors who worked at businesses which are closed can get UI benefits equal to 158% of their prior earnings, while janitors who continue to work at increased health risk in businesses deemed “essential” have no guarantees of any hazard pay or increased earnings…“ See: “US Unemployment Insurance Replacement Rates During the Pandemic” Peter Ganong, Pascal Noel, and Joseph Vavra May 15, 2020 https://bfi.uchicago.edu/wp-content/uploads/BFI_WP_202062-1.pdf (Includes great charts-diagrams showing per state differences. )

At the request of your staff, the Congressional Budget Office has examined the economic effects of extending the temporary increase of $600 per week in the benefit amount provided by unemployment programs…. Roughly five of every six recipients would receive benefits that exceeded the weekly amounts they could expect to earn from work during those six months…https://www.cbo.gov/system/files/2020-06/56387-CBO-Grassley-Letter.pdf

Entire statement (before president of senate) :
McSally Calls for 7-Day Extension of Expanded Unemployment Benefits

U.S. SENATE – U.S. Senator Martha McSally (R-AZ) today spoke on the Senate floor and called on Congress to pass a simple seven-day extension of expanded unemployment benefits while Congress finishes negotiations on the next coronavirus relief package.

“I’m asking Senators to simply extend expanded unemployment benefits for seven days while Congress comes up with a solution,” McSally said. “With the first of August approaching, Americans out of work are counting on us for cash so they can pay their rent and put food on the table for their families.”

Mr. President,
I deployed to Washington to be a pragmatic problem solver. And for the past five and a half years, I’ve made it my mission in Congress to better the lives of hardworking Arizonans. In a time of toxic partisanship, this is no easy feat. It requires reaching across the aisle to find where the Venn diagram overlaps. Today, I’m calling on my Senate colleagues to be pragmatic, to meet in the middle on what we should agree on. I’m asking Senators to simply extend expanded unemployment benefits for seven days while Congress comes up with a solution. Who could be against that?

With the first of August approaching, Americans out of work are counting on us for cash so they can pay their rent and put food on the table for their families. And while some states will get the expanded checks, we understand for the next week or two, Arizonans have gotten their last expanded check. These are Arizonans who are in my neighborhood, who live on my street, who worked paycheck to paycheck before this once-in-a-century pandemic hit.

Well, I’m here to tell them that Washington, D.C.’s dysfunction and bickering is alive and well. Congress once again is using hardworking Americans as pawns in their political games. For the many of Arizonans out of work right now, this is not a game.

Americans and Arizonans are calling out for our help and it’s time we deliver it.

What I’m offering today is a simple seven-day extension of the extra $600 a week for unemployed Americans while we work through our differences on how to move forward and see Americans through this first in a century crisis. This is a reasonable proposal. Who could possibly be against this?

I understand as we work to defeat this virus—which we will—and support the economic recovery of our country, we need to incentivize people to return to work safely when they are able.

There are disagreements in this chamber on what that looks like, what the ultimate dollar figure or percentage will be, where we land and for how long, but what I know today is that Congress needs to do their job and prevent this desperately-needed extra lifeline from fully expiring.

In this uncertain time, everyone is doing the best we can: to make ends meet, to help each other, to help our neighbors, to stay safe. Everyone, that is except, Congress.

Americans who have lost their livelihoods out of no fault of their own due to this cruel virus should not be collateral damage of political maneuvering.

I am calling on the Senate, let’s do what we were sent here to do. Let’s do our job. In the face of this virus, we have asked millions of Americans to go back to work when they can safely, to make hard decisions, and do what they were hired to do.

It is time for the Senate to do the same. This is a reasonable request. It is simply a seven-day extension of the expanded unemployment benefits, while we continue to work out our differences. Who could possibly be against this?

Therefore, I ask for unanimous consent that the Senate proceed to immediate consideration of my bill at the desk. I further ask that the bill be considered and read a third time and passed and that the motion to consider be considered and laid upon the table.

Mr. President, this is disappointing and a political stunt and a game and for all the normal people watching out there who don’t understand why Washington is so dysfunctional we’re just looking for a seven-day extension so they can get another check and pay their rent.

I asked the question ‘who could possibly be against this?’ Well, we found out. It’s the Senator from New York. So you can clip the tape or put his picture on your refrigerator when you open it up, because it’s the Minority Leader who is against this on his path to try and become the Majority Leader and that’s unfortunate.
Arizonans deserve better.
###
https://www.mcsally.senate.gov/news/press-releases/mcsally-calls-for-7-day-extension-of-expanded-unemployment-benefits

Romney, Collins, McSally Introduce Extension to Stop Disruption of Unemployment Benefits
Thursday, July 30, 2020
WASHINGTON—With federal unemployment insurance benefits expiring this week amid negotiations on COVID-19 relief, U.S. Senators Mitt Romney (R-UT), Susan Collins (R-ME), and Martha McSally (R-AZ) today introduced legislation that would prevent Americans from experiencing a sudden lapse in their supplemental benefits. The CARES Act authorized an extra $600 per week in federal unemployment payments, on top of state unemployment benefits. Today’s legislation incentivizes states to improve outdated unemployment insurance programs to better handle wage replacement, and ensures unemployed workers receiving federal benefits will maintain an average of $400 per week for the next three months as those payments are phased down. Text of the legislation is available here. link; https://www.romney.senate.gov/sites/default/files/2020-07/GOE20949.pdf

“Unemployed workers should not be left in limbo while Congress continues to negotiate the next relief package,” Senator Romney said. “Our solution extends the supplemental benefits for three months and incentivizes states to update their UI processing systems. We should act with urgency to help the millions of Americans who are on the verge of losing these additional benefits.”

“Earlier this year, Congress took the important step of boosting unemployment benefits rapidly in order to assist the growing number of Americans who lost their jobs through no fault of their own,” Senator Collins said. “As Congress continues to debate additional federal relief, we must avoid a sharp drop in benefits that would cause further harm to families that have been hit hard by the pandemic. The phased approach our bill creates would help individuals who have been laid off by compensating them for their lost wages in a way that does not create a disincentive to return to work if they are able to do so. At the same time, it would support states’ efforts to upgrade their unemployment systems.”

The Federal Pandemic Unemployment Compensation Extension Act of 2020 stops the impending unemployment insurance benefit disruption by:
Allowing states to choose one of two options for UI;
Immediate 80% wage replacement, or
A declining amount of $500 per week in August, $400 per week in September, or $300 per week in October
And providing an additional $2 billion for states to update their UI systems to better handled targeted wage replacement.
https://www.romney.senate.gov/romney-collins-mcsally-introduce-extension-stop-disruption-unemployment-benefits

unemployed janitors who worked at businesses which are closed can get UI benefits equal to 158% of their prior earnings, while janitors who continue to work at increased health risk in businesses deemed “essential” have no guarantees of any hazard pay or increased earnings… We find that 68% of unemployed workers who are eligible for UI will receive benefits which exceed lost earnings. The median replacement rate is 134%, and one out of five eligible unemployed workers will receive benefits at least twice as large as their lost earnings… We also show that there is sizable variation in the effects of the CARES Act across occupations and across states, with important distributional consequences. For example, the median retail worker who is laid-off can collect 142% of their prior wage in UI, while grocery workers are not receiving any automatic pay increases.“ Excerpt from: “US Unemployment Insurance Replacement Rates During the Pandemic” Peter Ganong, Pascal Noel, and Joseph Vavra May 15, 2020 https://bfi.uchicago.edu/wp-content/uploads/BFI_WP_202062-1.pdf
(Includes great charts-diagrams showing per state differences. )

At the request of your staff, the Congressional Budget Office has examined the economic effects of extending the temporary increase of $600 per week in the benefit amount provided by unemployment programs. Under the Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security (CARES) Act, that increase in unemployment benefits is in place through July 31, 2020.1 CBO estimates that extending that increase for six months through January 31, 2021, would have the following effects:

Roughly five of every six recipients would receive benefits that exceeded the weekly amounts they could expect to earn from work during those six months…

In CBO’s projections, the number of unemployed people remains high after the $600 per week benefit expires at the end of July. In the third quarter of 2020, an average of 25 million jobless people per week are available for work and are either seeking work or expecting to be recalled from a temporary layoff, and the unemployment rate is 16 percent.

Unemployment benefits are provided through a partnership between the federal government and state governments that provides a weekly payment to qualifying unemployed workers. To qualify for unemployment benefits through the unemployment insurance system, most workers must have lost their job through no fault of their own. In addition, the CARES Act created Pandemic Unemployment Assistance (PUA) to provide benefits to the self-employed and others who are working less or not at all for reasons related to the 2020 coronavirus pandemic.

Almost all current recipients of unemployment benefits can receive them through at least December 31, 2020, and depending on the circumstances, many may continue to receive benefits after that date. For example, workers in most states in which the unemployment rate is high enough are eligible for up to an additional 13 weeks of benefits.

Each state administers its unemployment insurance program within guidelines established by federal law. The number of weeks that a person can receive unemployment insurance benefits varies from state to state. PUA benefits are available for up to 39 weeks. The amount of weekly benefits depends on the minimum benefit and an individual’s prior earnings. The minimum unemployment insurance benefit amount varies by state. The minimum PUA benefit equals half of the state’s average weekly benefit from regular unemployment insurance in four recent quarters. Higher earners receive larger benefits, up to a maximum amount. Maximum regular benefits per week for a single person, for example, range from $235 in Mississippi to $823 in Massachusetts…

If the benefit of $600 per week was extended through January 2021, benefits would exceed 100 percent of potential earnings for roughly five of every six recipients of unemployment benefits from August 2020 to January 2021, CBO projects. For example, a single worker would have a ratio of benefits to potential earnings of 100 percent if his or her potential earnings were $21 per hour for 40 hours a week in Mississippi or $30 per hour for 40 hours a week in Massachusetts. For people with much lower potential earnings, that ratio is much higher.

If the benefit of $600 per week was extended, fewer than one in thirty recipients would receive benefits—generally the maximum amount in their state—that were less than 50 percent of their potential earnings, CBO projects. For example, for the ratio to be 50 percent for a worker in Mississippi, the worker’s potential earnings would have to be about $42 per hour for 40 hours a week; the potential earnings of a worker in Massachusetts with that same ratio would be about $71 per hour for 40 hours a week…“. https://www.cbo.gov/system/files/2020-06/56387-CBO-Grassley-Letter.pdf

Not sure if health insurance is factored in, or other benefits. Or if the people become temporarily eligible for Medicaid. People need 100% of what they had… not more or less. States should do this case by case, not a flat amount.

Some states are still sitting on money: https://home.treasury.gov/system/files/136/Interim-Report-of-Costs-Incurred-by-State-and-Local-Recipients-through-June-30.pdf