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Based on these statistics, it appears that recruiting more women as police officers could help reduce violence: “When it comes to their experiences in the field, women are less likely than men to say they have physically struggled with a suspect who was resisting arrest in the past month (22% vs. 35% of male officers). Six-in-ten female officers say they have been verbally abused by a citizen while on duty in the past month, compared with 69% of men. These differences remain when looking only at officers currently on field assignments, such as a patrol officers and detectives. Most police (72%) say they have never fired their weapon while on duty outside of required training or on a gun range. Female officers are much less likely than male officers to report that they have ever fired their weapon while on duty – 11% of women vs. 30% of men. There is also a significant gender gap in attitudes on policing, with female officers less likely than their male counterparts to agree that aggressive tactics are sometimes necessary. Among female officers, 48% agree that it is more useful to be aggressive than to be courteous in certain parts of the city, compared with 58% of male officers. A third of female officers – but 46% of male officers – agree that some people can only be brought to reason the hard, physical way. Women accounted for 12% of full-time local police officers in 2013” (Stepler-Pew Research Center, 2017 – see entire article below.)

29% of UK police officers are women, compared to under 13% in the United States: “In March 2017, the percentage of female officers was 29.1% in England and Wales, 29% in Scotland and 28.5% in Northern Ireland. In England and Wales, women made up a 61% majority of non-uniformed support staff (likewise in Northern Ireland) and 45% of Police Community Support Officers. The proportion of female special constables is similar to that of fulltime police officers. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Women_in_law_enforcement_in_the_United_Kingdom

This 2018 document says that “women constitute less than 13% of total officers (in the United States): https://www.ncjrs.gov/pdffiles1/nij/252963.pdf

From the Pew Research Center, Washington D.C.:
Female police officers’ on-the-job experiences diverge from those of male officers
BY RENEE STEPLER [1] JANUARY 17, 2017

In recent decades, women have accounted for a growing share of America’s police officers, but this growth has been relatively slow and women remain underrepresented in the field. They also sometimes differ sharply from male officers in their views of policing and their experiences, according to a new Pew Research Center survey [2] conducted by the National Police Research Platform.

Women accounted for 12% of full-time local police officers in 2013 (the latest data available) – up from 8% in 1987, according to the Bureau of Justice Statistics [3]. Women made up even smaller shares in department leadership: About one-in-ten supervisors or managers and just 3% of local police chiefs were women in 2013.

The nationwide survey [4] of 7,917 police officers in departments with at least 100 officers finds that many female officers think men in their department are treated better than women when it comes to assignments and promotions. About four-in-ten female officers (43%) say this is the case, compared with just 6% of male officers. By contrast, a third of male officers say women are treated better than men when it comes to assignments and promotions in their department – but just 6% of women say this is the case. Six-in-ten male officers and half of female officers say men and women are treated about the same.

When it comes to their experiences in the field, women are less likely than men to say they have physically struggled with a suspect who was resisting arrest in the past month (22% vs. 35% of male officers). Six-in-ten female officers say they have been verbally abused by a citizen while on duty in the past month, compared with 69% of men. These differences remain when looking only at officers currently on field assignments, such as a patrol officers and detectives. Most police (72%) say they have never fired their weapon while on duty outside of required training or on a gun range. Female officers are much less likely than male officers to report that they have ever fired their weapon while on duty – 11% of women vs. 30% of men.

There is also a significant gender gap in attitudes on policing, with female officers less likely than their male counterparts to agree that aggressive tactics are sometimes necessary. Among female officers, 48% agree that it is more useful to be aggressive than to be courteous in certain parts of the city, compared with 58% of male officers. A third of female officers – but 46% of male officers – agree that some people can only be brought to reason the hard, physical way.

At the same time, men and women share positive views of the citizens they serve. For example, about seven-in-ten male and female officers reject the notion that officers have reason to be distrustful of most citizens (72% and 70%, respectively). And similar shares say at least some of the people in the community where they work share their values and beliefs (70% of male officers and 73% of female officers).

Male and female officers also report a similar range of emotions about the job. About six-in-ten male and female officers say their job always or often makes them feel proud (58% and 61%, respectively) and about half of male and female officers say they often feel frustrated (51% and 52%). But 57% of male officers say they have become more callous since taking their job, compared with 49% of female officers.
Topics
Criminal Justice
Gender
Violence and Society
Work and Employment
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Renee Stepler is a former research analyst who focused on social and demographic trends research at Pew Research Center.
[1] https://www.pewresearch.org/staff/renee-stepler
[2] https://www.pewsocialtrends.org/2017/01/11/behind-the-badge/
[3] https://www.bjs.gov/content/pub/pdf/lpd13ppp.pdf
[4] https://www.pewresearch.org/fact-tank/2017/01/11/police-report-q-and-a/
Female police officers’ on-the-job experiences diverge from those of male officers
BY RENEE STEPLER. Pew Research Center, Washington D.C. (JANUARY 17, 2017) https://www.pewresearch.org/fact-tank/2017/01/17/female-police-officers-on-the-job-experiences-diverge-from-those-of-male-officers/

In New Zealand, women make up more than 30% of total staff and nearly 20% of sworn officers. The New Zealand Police have committed to equal representation by 2021 and have intentionally focused their recruitment efforts on attracting a diverse pool of applicants that is representative of the New Zealand population. A police recruitment video from New Zealand was shown at the summit as an example of these efforts. The video features women officers, portrays police interacting with the community, emphasizes the value of communication and relationship building, and uses humor to promote a different image of police and police work.15

“We shouldn’t just recruit from criminal justice programs. We should also recruit from nursing, psychology, and other ‘serving’ programs. We can teach skills.” ” Excerpt from: “NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF JUSTICE SPECIAL REPORT WOMEN IN POLICING: BREAKING BARRIERS AND BLAZING A PATH” July 2019 https://www.ncjrs.gov/pdffiles1/nij/252963.pdf

Gender inequality is still a defining aspect of law enforcement, even in today’s world of slowly increasing employment fairness. Women comprise only a small percentage of the local law enforcement in agencies across the nation. Though their presence in the police force dates back to the beginning of the 20th century, it’s only been noticeable in the past 40 years. In the 1970s, women accounted for roughly 2 percent of sworn officers, with most of the women holding clerical positions. Yet, despite progressive legislation aimed at procuring gender equality in the United States, women today make up only 13 percent of the force, most significantly in larger departments. Women in law enforcement are often inexplicitly resented by their male counterparts and many face harassment. Additionally, many women encounter a ‘brass’ ceiling and are unable to rise to supervisory positions despite their qualifications. Many women do not even try to reach these positions because of fear of oppression from male coworkers. Few women receive the guidance necessary to overcome this obstacle; however, the National Association of Women Law Enforcement Executives (NAWLEE) has been working hard since 1995 to mentor women in executive positions and help guide new female officers to grasp the opportunity to achieve these leadership roles. Their president, Commander Kristen Ziman of the Aurora (Illinois) Police Department who has endured the hard process of becoming an executive, shared her experience as a woman in law enforcement and her recommendations to others starting this difficult journey.https://cops.usdoj.gov/html/dispatch/07-2013/women_in_law_enforcement.asp

20/20 The Real Rookies Pt. 2: Woman becomes Houston’s oldest rookie police officer“:

Link: https://youtu.be/EpKn1vANxmk