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I do not believe in the creed professed by the Jewish church, by the Roman church, by the Greek church, by the Turkish church, by the Protestant church, nor by any church that I know of… Whenever we read the obscene stories, the voluptuous debaucheries, the cruel and tortuous executions, the unrelenting vindictiveness with which more than half the Bible is filled, it would be more consistent that we call it the word of a demon than the word of God.” (Thomas Paine)

THIS IS LOL AND ROLL ON THE FLOOR FUNNY! NOT ONLY DO THESE “EVANGELICALS” NOT KNOW JESUS, AS WE NOTED YESTERDAY, THEY DON’T KNOW WHO THOMAS PAINE WAS? HA, HA, HA! They aren’t even using and abusing scripture! So, when they ask you are you “saved”, tell them “saved from what?” as my theologian-preacher father told the door-to-door “evangelicals”, and “saved from the likes of you” (as I added at the time, LOL). So-called “evangelicals” have done more to destroy Christianity than any other group.

This statement is not meant to diminish or make fun of devout well-meaning evangelicals who live out their witness.

PAINE BELIEVED IN GOD & ETHICS BUT NEITHER ORGANIZED RELIGION NOR CHRISTIANITY.

TRUMPIAN “EVANGELICALS” BELIEVE IN AN ETHICS-FREE “CHRISTIANITY” WHERE TRUMP IS APPARENTLY THE MESSIAH.

They believe that a life that matters ends at birth, whereas the Democrats believe that a life that matters ends after someone has immigrated to this country.

Jim Daly: Christianity Today is wrong to want Trump removed – Here’s the evangelical argument in his favor OPINION” By Jim Daly | Fox News https://archive.li/O3FAW

In the Fox opinion Daly quotes Thomas Paine saying: “These are the times that try men’s souls. … Heaven knows how to put a proper price upon its goods; and it would be strange indeed if so celestial an article as FREEDOM should not be highly rated.”

THIS IS WHAT ELSE PAINE SAID:
The opinions I have advanced … are the effect of the most clear and long-established conviction that the Bible and the Testament are impositions upon the world, that the fall of man, the account of Jesus Christ being the Son of God, and of his dying to appease the wrath of God, and of salvation, by that strange means, are all fabulous inventions, dishonorable to the wisdom and power of the Almighty; that the only true religion is Deism, by which I then meant, and mean now, the belief of one God, and an imitation of his moral character, or the practice of what are called moral virtues – and that it was upon this only (so far as religion is concerned) that I rested all my hopes of happiness hereafter. So say I now – and so help me God….

About his own religious beliefs, Paine wrote in The Age of Reason:
I believe in one God, and no more; and I hope for happiness beyond this life.
I do not believe in the creed professed by the Jewish church, by the Roman church, by the Greek church, by the Turkish church, by the Protestant church, nor by any church that I know of. My own mind is my own church. All national institutions of churches, whether Jewish, Christian or Turkish, appear to me no other than human inventions, set up to terrify and enslave mankind, and monopolize power and profit.
Whenever we read the obscene stories, the voluptuous debaucheries, the cruel and tortuous executions, the unrelenting vindictiveness with which more than half the Bible is filled, it would be more consistent that we call it the word of a demon than the word of God. It is a history of wickedness that has served to corrupt and brutalize mankind; and, for my part, I sincerely detest it, as I detest everything that is cruel
.[110] https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thomas_Paine

Paine’s attack on monarchy in Common Sense is essentially an attack on George III. Whereas colonial resentments were originally directed primarily against the king’s ministers and Parliament, Paine laid the responsibility firmly at the king’s door. Common Sense was the most widely read pamphlet of the American Revolution. It was a clarion call for unity against the corrupt British court, so as to realize America’s providential role in providing an asylum for liberty. Written in a direct and lively style, it denounced the decaying despotisms of Europe and pilloried hereditary monarchy as an absurdity. At a time when many still hoped for reconciliation with Britain, Common Sense demonstrated to many the inevitability of separation.[33]
Paine was not on the whole expressing original ideas in Common Sense, but rather employing rhetoric as a means to arouse resentment of the Crown. To achieve these ends, he pioneered a style of political writing suited to the democratic society he envisioned, with Common Senseserving as a primary example. Part of Paine’s work was to render complex ideas intelligible to average readers of the day, with clear, concise writing unlike the formal, learned style favored by many of Paine’s contemporaries.[34] Scholars have put forward various explanations to account for its success, including the historic moment, Paine’s easy-to-understand style, his democratic ethos, and his use of psychology and ideology.[35]
Common Sense was immensely popular in disseminating to a very wide audience ideas that were already in common use among the elite who comprised Congress and the leadership cadre of the emerging nation, who rarely cited Paine’s arguments in their public calls for independence.[36] The pamphlet probably had little direct influence on the Continental Congress’ decision to issue a Declaration of Independence, since that body was more concerned with how declaring independence would affect the war effort.[37] One distinctive idea in Common Sense is Paine’s beliefs regarding the peaceful nature of republics; his views were an early and strong conception of what scholars would come to call the democratic peace theory.[38]
Loyalists vigorously attacked Common Sense; one attack, titled Plain Truth (1776), by Marylander James Chalmers, said Paine was a political quack[39] and warned that without monarchy, the government would “degenerate into democracy”.[40] Even some American revolutionaries objected to Common Sense; late in life John Adams called it a “crapulous mass”. Adams disagreed with the type of radical democracy promoted by Paine (that men who did not own property should still be allowed to vote and hold public office) and published Thoughts on Government in 1776 to advocate a more conservative approach to republicanism.[41]
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thomas_Paine

PAINE IS ON TO SOMETHING REGARDING ORGANIZED RELIGION. AND, ACTUALLY, JESUS DIDN’T LIKE RELIGIOUS HYPOCRISY, EITHER, WHICH IS ONE REASON HE WAS KILLED.

Mark 11:15-19 King James Version (KJV)
15 And they come to Jerusalem: and Jesus went into the temple, and began to cast out them that sold and bought in the temple, and overthrew the tables of the moneychangers, and the seats of them that sold doves;
16 And would not suffer that any man should carry any vessel through the temple.
17 And he taught, saying unto them, Is it not written, My house shall be called of all nations the house of prayer? but ye have made it a den of thieves.
18 And the scribes and chief priests heard it, and sought how they might destroy him: for they feared him, because all the people was astonished at his doctrine.
19 And when even was come, he went out of the city.”
More relevant Bible verses found here: https://miningawareness.wordpress.com/2019/12/23/177-so-called-evangelicals-apparently-missed-jesus-chasing-the-money-changers-from-the-temple-among-other-things/


The Friends of the People caricatured by Isaac Cruikshank, November 15, 1792, Joseph Priestley and Thomas Paine are surrounded by incendiary items” via Wikimedia.