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LOUISIANA — The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers opened the Morganza floodway, May 14, 2011.
(U.S. Army Corps of Engineers photo)

In scenarios presented by the USACE, flooding of significant amounts of cropland was inevitable with or without operation of the Morganza Spillway due to the severity of this flood event.

Therefore, crop losses resulting from such flooding is caused by unavoidable, naturally occurring events and is insurable under the Basic Provisions and the individual Crop Provisions for crop programs applicable to this area.” (Martin Barbre, USDA, May 28, 2019)

In other words, if they don’t allow controlled release, there will be uncontrolled release, in the form of dam-levee failures. The Mighty Mississippi River has long wanted to change course and go that way.

So, the Mighty Mississippi River, “father of waters” will go where it wants, one way or the other.

However, if it is uncontrolled failure, this could lead to major problems in the petrochemical corridor, and even a nuclear accident at Waterford Nuclear Power Station (Killona), located near a historic levee failure (crevasse) .

From the USDA:
MANAGERS BULLETIN: MGR–19-013
DATE
May 28, 2019
TO:
All Approved Insurance Providers
All Risk Management Agency Field Offices
All Other Interested Parties
FROM:
Martin R. Barbre, Administrator /s/ Martin R. Barbre 5/28/2019
SUBJECT:
Flooding of the Morganza Floodway
Background
Mississippi River Commission President and United States Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) Mississippi Valley Division Commander Maj. Gen. Richard Kaiser has approved the request to operate the Morganza Control Structure and Floodway. If forecasted conditions remain unchanged, the operation will begin on June 2, 2019.

The Morganza Floodway is part of the Mississippi River Valley Project located about 20 miles south of Natchez, Mississippi.

The Morganza Spillway is intended to operate during emergency flooding to divert excess floodwater from the Mississippi River into the Morganza Floodway and Atchafalaya Basin. Current forecasts indicate that the river will reach a stage of more than 62 feet at Red River Landing on June 5, 2019.

Based on this information, the USACE New Orleans District Commander Michael Clancy requested permission to operate the Morganza Floodway to prevent the flood control structure from overtopping, to minimize stress in leveed reaches and to preserve encroachment on freeboard downstream.

Although conditions can change, USACE currently anticipates the need to divert approximately 150,000 cubic feet per second into the floodway to avoid overtopping of the structure.

In accordance with lessons learned during the 2011 historic Mississippi River, USACE will implement a gradual opening of the floodway to minimize impacts to wildlife.

The gradual opening allows the USACE to limit elevations in the floodway by adding one foot of water per day for the first three days.

The current flood fight is historic and unprecedented. May 27th marked the 214th day of the flood fight and is expected to surpass the 1973 event (225 days) as the longest flood fight. This flood is also the first time the Bonnet Carre’ Spillway has opened in back-to-back years as well as the first time it has been operated twice during the same calendar year.

Section 508 (a)(1) of the Federal Crop Insurance Act specifies that coverage is provided for flood, drought or other natural disasters. This is reflected in section 12 of the Common Crop Insurance Policy Basic Provisions (18-BR) (Basic Provisions), which states:
“Insurance is provided only to protect against unavoidable,
naturally occurring events.”

Action
In scenarios presented by the USACE, flooding of significant amounts of cropland was inevitable with or without operation of the Morganza Spillway due to the severity of this flood event.

Therefore, crop losses resulting from such flooding is caused by unavoidable, naturally occurring events and is insurable under the Basic Provisions and the individual Crop Provisions for crop programs applicable to this area.

DISPOSAL DATE:
December 31, 2019
https://www.rma.usda.gov/en/Policy-and-Procedure/Bulletins-and-Memos/2019/MGR-19-013

1927 Mississippi Flood Map – before the new levee control systems.