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Bermuda High
A semi-permanent, subtropical area of high pressure in the North Atlantic Ocean off the East Coast of North America that migrates east and west with varying central pressure. Depending on the season, it has different names. When it is displaced westward, during the Northern Hemispheric summer and fall, the center is located in the western North Atlantic, near Bermuda. In the winter and early spring, it is primarily centered near the Azores in the eastern part of the North Atlantic. Also known as Azores High.
“. https://forecast.weather.gov/glossary.php?word=Bermuda%20high

From NASA:
Bermuda High Released on June 7, 2006

[Youtube video Link: http://youtu.be/8g5tGP2oPDk ]

The Bermuda High pressure system sits over the Atlantic during summer. This visualization first shows a typical Bermuda High system. Then, it expands the Bermuda High to show what happened in the summer of 2004 and 2005.

The Bermuda High pressure system sits over the Atlantic during summer. Acting as a block that hurricanes cannot penetrate, the size and location of this system can determine where hurricanes go. A normal Bermuda High often leads to hurricanes moving up the east coast and out to sea. During summer 2004 and 2005, the Bermuda High expanded to the south and west, which steered hurricanes into the Gulf of Mexico rather than up the east coast or curving out to sea. Once in the Gulf, most hurricane paths will involve landfall at some location.

During summer 2004 and 2005, the Bermuda High expanded to the south and west, which steered hurricanes into the Gulf of Mexico rather than up the east coast or curving out to sea.
Credits
Susan Twardy (HTSI): Lead Animator
David Adamec (NASA/GSFC): Scientist
Please give credit for this item to:
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center Conceptual Images Lab
Short URL to share this page:

http://svs.gsfc.nasa.gov/10069
A related video:

Video link: http://youtu.be/Wa5qlDAh3c8
Subtropical Highs
The sun is the ultimate source of energy that drives the earth’s weather. Most of the energy reaches the equatorial regions and the least energy reaches the poles, causing the tropics to warm and the poles to cool. The earth’s atmosphere redistributes this heat imbalance through a complex set of atmospheric circulation patterns. The warm air at the low latitudes rises and moves toward the poles. The rising air, and the subsequent clouds and precipitation, cause the tropics to be very wet. As the air moves towards the subtropics, it descends over the oceans and creates semi-permanent circulation features called subtropical highs. In the Northern Hemisphere, these high pressure systems are located over the North Pacific and North Atlantic oceans. The North Atlantic High is generally centered over Bermuda, so it is also known as the Bermuda High. The descending air under subtropical highs warms and dries as it descends, resulting in generally sunny skies and dry weather. Cold air from the poles flows toward lower latitudes in order to complete the redistribution of the heat imbalance in the atmosphere. This cold polar air collides with warmer subtropical air in the mid-latitudes, resulting in frontal precipitation and low pressure cyclonic storm systems.

This entire system of fronts, subtropical highs, and tropical rain migrates with the seasons, moving northward during the Northern Hemisphere summer and southward during the Northern Hemisphere winter. Sometimes during the summer, the Bermuda High will extend further to the west than usual, encompassing a significant part of the southern and eastern United States. Its descending air inhibits precipitation and its anticyclonic circulation pattern deflects tropical storms and hurricanes to the south and weakens cold fronts to its north, resulting in heat waves and droughts.https://www.ncdc.noaa.gov/monitoring-references/dyk/subtropical-highs