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Celebration at a Syriac Orthodox monastery in Mosul, Ottoman Syria, early 20th century, public domain via wikimedia
Celebration at a Syriac Orthodox monastery in Mosul, Ottoman Syria, early 20th century. (Mosul sits opposite the ancient Assyrian city of Nineveh.)
Assyrian Empires Map released to public domain via Wikipedia
Aramaic is generally held to be the primary language of Jesus. The Peshitta Bible is in Aramaic.
Peshitta text of Exodus 13:14–16 produced in Amida in the year 464 Via Wikipedia
Peshitta text of Exodus 13:14–16 produced in Amida in the year 464.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Peshitta https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Language_of_Jesus
Syriac is an Aramaic dialect: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Syriac_language

Excerpted from Wikipedia:
Assyrian people (Syriac: ‫ܐܫܘܪܝܐ‬‎), or Syriacs[31] (see names of Syriac Christians), are an ethnic group indigenous to the Middle East.[32][33] Some of them self-identify as Chaldeans,[34] or as Arameans.[35] They speak modern Aramaic, whose subdivisions include Northeastern, Central, and Western Neo-Aramaic, as well as another language, dependent on the country of residence.[36]The Assyrians are Syriac-speaking Christians who claim descent from Assyria, one of the oldest civilizations in the world, dating back to 2500 BC in ancient Mesopotamia.[37]

The areas that form the Assyrian homeland are parts of present-day northern Iraq, southeastern Turkey, northwestern Iran and northeastern Syria.[38][39] The majority have migrated to other regions of the world, including North America, the Levant, Australia, Europe, Russia and the Caucasus during the past century or so.[40] Emigration was triggered by such events as the Assyrian Genocide in the Ottoman Empire during World War I, the Simele Massacre in Iraq in 1933, the Iranian Revolution of 1979, Arab Nationalist Ba’athist policies in Iraq and Syria such as the al-Anfal campaign of Saddam Hussein, and the rise of ISIS and its takeover of most of the Nineveh Plains.[41][42]

Assyrians are predominantly Christian, mostly adhering to the East and West Syrian liturgical rites of Christianity.[43] The churches that constitute the East Syrian rite include the Assyrian Church of the East, Ancient Church of the East, and Chaldean Catholic Church, whose followers mostly speak the Northeasternbranch of East Aramaic. Whereas the churches of the West Syrian rite, the Syriac Orthodox Church and Syriac Catholic Church, mostly speak the Centraland Western branches.

Most recently, the 2003 Iraq War and the Syrian Civil War which began in 2011 have displaced the regional Assyrian community, because its people have faced ethnic and religious persecution at the hands of Islamic extremists. Of the one million or more Iraqis reported by the United Nations to have fled Iraq since the occupation, nearly 40% were Assyrians even though Assyrians comprised only around 3% of the pre-war Iraqi demography.[44][45][46] According to a 2013 report by a Chaldean Syriac Assyrian Popular Council official, it is estimated that only 300,000 Assyrians remain in Iraq.[3] Due to the Syrian Civil War, however, many Iraqis, including Assyrians, have fled back into Iraq, specifically to northern Iraq and the part of the country controlled by the Iraqi government, with ISIS still in control of much of the Assyrian homeland.
1. ^ “Assyria”. Unrepresented Nations and Peoples Organization. unpo.org.
2. ^ a b “Syria’s Assyrians threatened by extremists – Al-Monitor: the Pulse of the Middle East”. Al-Monitor. Retrieved 18 February 2015.
3. ^ a b c “مسؤول مسيحي : عدد المسيحيين في العراق تراجع الى ثلاثمائة الف”. Retrieved 18 February 2015.
4. ^ a b c “Ishtar: Documenting The Crisis In The Assyrian Iranian Community”. aina.org.
5. ^ a b United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (2010-10-13). “Iran: Last of the Assyrians”. Refworld. Retrieved 2013-09-18.
6. ^ United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees. “Refworld – World Directory of Minorities and Indigenous Peoples – Turkey : Assyrians”. Refworld.
7. ^ Joshua Project. “Assyrian in Turkey”. Retrieved 18 February 2015.
8. ^ a b Data Access and Dissemination Systems (DADS). “American FactFinder – Results”. Retrieved 18 February 2015.
9. ^ a b “Brief History of Assyrians”. Retrieved 18 February 2015.
10. ^ a b Thrown to the Lions, Doug Bandow, The America Spectator
11. ^ a b Jordan Should Legally Recognize Displaced Iraqis As Refugees, AINA.org. Assyrian and Chaldean Christians Flee Iraq to Neighboring Jordan, ASSIST News Service
12. ^ a b Demographics of Sweden, Swedish Language Council “Sweden has also one of the largest exile communities of Assyrian and Syriac Christians (also known as Chaldeans) with a population of around 100,000.”
13. ^ a b “Erzdiözese”. Retrieved 18 February 2015.
14. ^ Tore Kjeilen. “Lebanon / Religions – LookLex Encyclopaedia”. Looklex.com. Retrieved 2013-09-18.
15. ^ “Statistics from the 2011 Census” (PDF). The People of NSW. Department of Immigration and Citizenship, Commonwealth of Australia. 2014. Table 13, Ancestry. Retrieved 23 July 2016.
16. ^ a b c d e “CNN Under-Estimates Iraqi Assyrian Population”. Aina.org. Retrieved 2013-09-18.
17. ^ Wieviorka & Bataille 2007, pp. 166
18. ^ “Google Translate”. Translate.googleusercontent.com. Retrieved 2013-09-18.
19. ^ Statistics Canada. “2011 National Household Survey: Data tables”. Retrieved 11 February 2014.
20. ^ Joshua Project. “Assyrian of United Kingdom Ethnic People Profile”. Joshuaproject.net. Retrieved 2013-09-18.
21. ^ Tzilivakis, Kathy (10 May 2003). “Iraq’s Forgotten Christians Face Exclusion in Greece”. Athens News. Retrieved 7 April 2012.
22. ^ “Georgia – ecoi.net – European Country of Origin Information Network”. Retrieved 18 February 2015.
23. ^ State statistics committee of Ukraine – National composition of population, 2001 census (Ukrainian)
24. ^ 2011 Armenian Census
25. ^ http://www.stats.govt.nz/ New Zealand 2006 census
26. ^ Joshua Project. “Assyrian in Azerbaijan”. Retrieved 18 February 2015.
27. ^ [1][permanent dead link]
28. ^ “Assyrian Community in Kazakhstan Survived Dark Times, Now Focuses on Education”. The Astana Times. Retrieved 18 February 2015.
29. ^ Kazakhstan Live
30. ^ “Assyrian Association Founded in Finland”. aina.org. Retrieved 18 February 2015.
31. ^ For use of the term Syriac, see:
* John A. Shoup, Ethnic Groups of Africa and the Middle East: An Encyclopedia, p. 30
* Nicholas Aljeloo, Who Are The Assyrians?
* UNPO Assyria
* Steven L. Danver, Native Peoples of the World: An Encyclopedia of Groups, Cultures and Contemporary Issues, p. 517
* James Minahan, Encyclopedia of the Stateless Nations: A-C, pp. 205-206
32. ^ For Assyrians as indigenous to the Middle East, see
* Mordechai Nisan, Minorities in the Middle East: A History of Struggle and Self-Expression, p. 180
* James Minahan, Encyclopedia of the Stateless Nations: A-C, p. 206
* Carl Skutsch, Encyclopedia of the World’s Minorities, p. 149
* Steven L. Danver, Native Peoples of the World: An Encyclopedia of Groups, Cultures and Contemporary Issues, p. 517
* UNPO Assyria
* Richard T. Schaefer, Encyclopedia of Race, Ethnicity, and Society, p. 107
33. ^ James Minahan, Encyclopedia of the Stateless Nations: A-C, pp. 205-209
34. ^ For use of the term Chaldean, see:
* John A. Shoup, Ethnic Groups of Africa and the Middle East: An Encyclopedia, p. 30 [2]
* Nicholas Aljeloo, Who Are The Assyrians? [3]
* Mordechai Nisan, Minorities in the Middle East: A History of Struggle and Self-Expression, p. 180 [4]
* UNPO Assyria [5]
* Steven L. Danver, Native Peoples of the World: An Encyclopedia of Groups, Cultures and Contemporary Issues, p. 517 [6]
35. ^ For use of the term Aramean, see
* Donabed & Mako, Identity of Syrian Orthodox Christians, p. 72
* Nicholas Aljeloo, Who Are The Assyrians?
* John A. Shoup, Ethnic Groups of Africa and the Middle East: An Encyclopedia, p. 30
36. ^ Carl Skutsch, Encyclopedia of the World’s Minorities, p. 149
37. ^ A. Leo Oppenheim (1964). Ancient Mesopotamia (PDF). The University of Chicago Press.
38. ^ Donabed, Sargon (2015). Reforging a Forgotten History: Iraq and the Assyrians in the Twentieth Century. Edinburgh University Press. ISBN 978-0-7486-8605-6.
39. ^ a b Carl Skutsch (2013). Encyclopedia of the World’s Minorities. Routledge. p. 149. ISBN 978-1-135-19388-1.
40. ^ Joshua Project. “Assyrian in Georgia”. Retrieved 18 February 2015.
41. ^ http://www.aina.org/news/20160721201009.htm
42. ^ Eden Naby. “Documenting The Crisis In The Assyrian Iranian Community”.
43. ^ For Assyrians as a Christian people, see
* Joel J. Elias, The Genetics of Modern Assyrians and their Relationship to Other People of the Middle East [7]
* Steven L. Danver, Native Peoples of the World: An Encyclopedia of Groups, Cultures and Contemporary Issues, p. 517
* UNPO Assyria
* James Minahan, Encyclopedia of the Stateless Nations: A-C, p. 209
44. ^ “Assyrian Christians ‘Most Vulnerable Population’ in Iraq”. The Christian Post. Archived from the original on 6 December 2006. Retrieved 2006-12-05.
45. ^ “Iraq’s Christian community, fights for its survival”. Christian World News.
46. ^ “U.S. Gov’t Watchdog Urges Protection for Iraq’s Assyrian Christians”. The Christian Post. Retrieved 2007-12-31.
47. ^ Georges Roux – Ancient Iraq, p. 187
48. ^ Genesis 25:3
49. ^ Artifacts show rivals Athens and Sparta, Yahoo News, December 5, 2006.
As last modified on 16 February 2017, at 05:55, CC-BY-SA
, Emphasis our own: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Assyrian_people (The article is much longer, as are the references. We have left some additional references in case we decide to add more of the text, as saved.)

West Mosul residents told battle is imminent as Iraqi forces begin moving
Posted:Sat, 18 Feb 2017 16:50:53 -0500
BAGHDAD (Reuters) – Iraqi planes dropped millions of leaflets on the western side of Mosul warning residents that the battle to dislodge Islamic State is imminent as troops began moving in their direction, the Defence Ministry said on Saturday.

http://feeds.reuters.com/~r/Reuters/worldNews/~3/pGd1fSKDD-8/us-mideast-crisis-iraq-mosul-idUSKBN15X08P