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This is what the National Guard is for – to help out during natural diasters, as well as protecting the homeland. It is not for helping out during nuclear emergencies, as seems to be the backup plan for the nuclear industry, nor for foreign wars https://miningawareness.wordpress.com/2016/01/03/nuclear-strategic-alliance-for-flex-emergency-response-safer-not-depends-on-emergency-resources-which-may-be-needed-elsewhere-unavailable/
National Guard rescues 19,000 in flood-affected areas
By Louisiana National Guard Public Affairs Office August 18, 2016
A Louisiana National Guardsman guiding a Humvee through floodwaters off of I-12 outside of Denham Springs. (Photo Credit: Spc. Garrett L. Dipuma, Army National Guard )
A Louisiana National Guardsman guiding a Humvee through floodwaters off of I-12 outside of Denham Springs. (Photo Credit: Spc. Garrett L. Dipuma, Army National Guard )
Sgt. Chad McCann of Deville, Louisiana, crew chief with F Company, 2-135th MEDEVAC, brings a young child to the waiting UH-60 Blackhawk to be taken to safety after flood waters threatened his home in South Louisiana, Aug. 15, 2016. More than 3,880 Louisiana National Guardsmen are still engaged in flood response efforts, to include rescues, evacuations, security patrols, engineering missions, and commodities distribution. (Photo Credit: Chief Warrant Officer 3 Jesse Curtis)
Sgt. Chad McCann of Deville, Louisiana, crew chief with F Company, 2-135th MEDEVAC, brings a young child to the waiting UH-60 Blackhawk to be taken to safety after flood waters threatened his home in South Louisiana, Aug. 15, 2016. More than 3,880 Louisiana National Guardsmen are still engaged in flood response efforts, to include rescues, evacuations, security patrols, engineering missions, and commodities distribution. (Photo Credit: Chief Warrant Officer 3 Jesse Curtis)
Soldiers from the Louisiana National Guard's 2228th Military Police Company headquarted in Alexandria setting up cots inside of the Baton Rouge River Center August 15, 2016 after major flooding pushed them from their homes over the last several days.. Guardsman here are also assisting Louisiana State Police with security. (Photo Credit: Spc. Garrett L. Dipuma, Army National Guard )
Soldiers from the Louisiana National Guard’s 2228th Military Police Company headquarted in Alexandria setting up cots inside of the Baton Rouge River Center August 15, 2016 after major flooding pushed them from their homes over the last several days.. Guardsman here are also assisting Louisiana State Police with security. (Photo Credit: Spc. Garrett L. Dipuma, Army National Guard)

BATON ROUGE, La. — Nearly 4,000 Louisiana National Guardsmen are engaged in emergency response efforts due to heavy flash flooding in 12 parishes.

Since rescue operations began on Friday, Aug. 12, the Louisiana National Guard has rescued more than 19,000 citizens and 2,600 pets. Guardsmen have distributed more than 76,000 meals, 389,000 bottled waters, 460 tarps and 960,000 sandbags.

The Louisiana National Guard is assisting and conducting evacuations, security patrols, and engineering missions. Guardsmen have provided shelter support to people affected by the flooding with more than 2,200 cots and 1,700 blankets.

“With the changing conditions, we are continuously adapting to the needs on the ground,” said Maj. Gen. Glenn H. Curtis, adjutant general of the Louisiana National Guard.

“We continue to work closely with our state partner agencies making the most of opportunities to leverage resources and manpower to keep Louisiana citizens safe and maintain order.”

Over the course of these operations, Louisiana Guardsmen have supported local, state, and federal agencies with more than 230 high-water vehicles, 50 boats, 11 Bridge Erection Boats, and nine helicopters.

The Louisiana National Guard has liaison officer teams stationed in eight parishes to assist with operations as needed: Ascension, St. Helena, Tangipahoa, East Baton Rouge, Livingston, Vermillion, St. James and St. John.

Louisiana’s Guardsmen are trained, ready and equipped to stand up at any moment to protect lives and property, maintain communications, and ensure the continuity of operations and government.
https://www.army.mil/article/173589/national_guard_rescues_19000_in_flood_affected_areas

(Some may argue that this isn’t a natural disaster. Perhaps the better term is human enhanced natural disaster, but all of that is another post for another day.)