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It’s rather strange that Donald Trump, whose mother immigrated to America from the UK in 1930, 300 years after Senator Elizabeth Warren’s family immigrated in 1730, has decided that he is an expert on her ancestry. There has been mixing of races-ethnic groups in America for 400 years. But, what would Trump know about that? His mother was born in the UK and his German born grandfather loved America so much that he went back to Germany to get a German wife. So, unless his mother had an affair, he is exactly 1/2 German and 1/2 British. Clearly he knows nothing about the history of America. Warren cannot be a member of an American Indian tribe because tribal membership is not based on ancestry, per se. However, everyone can rest assured that she is part American Indian and/or part African American. As explained below, for Warren’s parents and grandparents there was no benefit in claiming American Indian ancestry and hiding it would be more the norm. Claims of American Indian ancestry could also hide African ancestry. Interestly, slaves formerly owned by American Indians were eligible for tribal enrollment, whereas those with American Indian ancestors who ceased to be tribal members, for whatever reasons, cannot. (More details on Trump and Warren’s ancestors at post bottom).
Choctaw Cherokee General LaRita Aragon
Okla. General Proud of Her Cherokee, Choctaw Heritage
By Rudi Williams
 American Forces Press Service
WASHINGTON, Nov. 25, 2003 – When LaRita Aragon was growing up in Dale, Okla. population about 300 — in the ’50s, ’60s and ’70s, being an American Indian wasn’t in vogue.

I was taught respect for elders, leaders and our land, but not for my Native (American) heritage,” said the assistant adjutant general of the Oklahoma Air National Guard and Air National Guard assistant to the assistant secretary of the Air Force for financial management in Washington.

“When I entered the military 26 years ago, I made a conscious decision to declare my native heritage,” said Aragon, the first woman American Indian general in the military and the first woman commander in the Oklahoma Air National Guard. “I, along with my sister and three aunts, have researched our genealogy to reach the branches of our family tree.”

What they found was that they are of Cherokee and Choctaw descent. Her father, Rhoper Bly, is part Choctaw. Born in Pueblo, Colo., he retired after 38 years in the maintenance department at Tinker Air Force Base. Her Cherokee mother, Jimmie Bly, a native of Guinn, Ala., retired from Tinker as an aircraft inspector. Her sister, Connie Jenkins, is a computer programmer at Tinker.

“My great-great-grandparents refused to give up their property to place themselves on the roles as American Indians,” Aragon noted. “Therefore, I don’t have a Bureau of Indian Affairs card, nor have I been able to acquire one.”

Aragon said the military’s attitude toward Indians and women proved much different from societal attitudes and behaviors. She said being a woman has never kept her from being promoted in the military, and her heritage was viewed as a plus. “I believe that the military is one of the greatest leveling fields for equality that there is,” the general said.

At the age of 30, Aragon enlisted in the Oklahoma Air National Guard on Sept. 9, 1979. She became a draftsman apprentice with the 219th Engineering Installation Squadron in Oklahoma City. At the time, she had a bachelor’s degree in education and master’s in guidance and counseling, but didn’t apply for a commission.

But there was a method to her madness. “In the Air National Guard, the vast majority of commissioned positions are attained by proving yourself in an enlisted position,” the general explained.

In setting the stage for her climb up the rungs of success, Aragon became a workaholic, taking every mission she could get from the engineering units. She also volunteered to serve on boards and for jobs no one else wanted to do.

“I built a reputation for getting the job done, and I had some great supporters in my squadron and in the wing,” she said. “They gave me chances to train and be visible in mission assignments.”

Meantime, she interviewed for every officer position that came open in her unit. “After two guys failed at the commissioning academy, I got a shot at a slot,” Aragon said. “I’d applied three times, but did not give up my hope of being an officer.”

She received her commission through the Academy of Military Science in Knoxville, Tenn., in October 1981. She returned to the 219th as an administrative officer. In February 1989, Brig. Gen. Aragon became the first female commander in the Oklahoma Air National Guard when she assumed command of the 137th Services Flight at Will Rogers Air National Guard Base.

Why would an award-winning schoolteacher enlist in the Guard? “I was a single mother and my children’s father wasn’t paying child support,” Aragon explained. “I couldn’t get by financially without an additional income.”

A church elder, who was a guardsman, suggested that she sign up. “He assured me they would let me work when I was not teaching, and I could build a second career,” Aragon said. “I fell in love with the people and the mission and found a whole new look at life. I immediately gained about 1,000 big brothers, who looked after my children and my welfare. They were there through every upturn and down and became an extended family I could lean on.”

In civilian life, Aragon taught kindergarten through seventh grade. “My favorite was fifth grade because I enjoyed their development and sense of humor at that age,” she said. “I started in an all-black school in 1970, before Oklahoma City began integration of the school district. I’d never been exposed to children of color, and they taught me as much about their culture as I could have ever taught them math, reading, writing or social studies. I became a part of their community — lived, ate and played in their environment.”

She said she became a principal in 1984 and was named “Principal of the Year” in 1988 and 1992. “I thrived in a multicultural school that was turned from a high-risk, low-achieving elementary into a center for community involvement,” Aragon noted. “It was recognized for academic achievement and parent involvement.” She was selected as the Oklahoma City Chamber of Commerce Excellent Educator of the Year in 1990.
Recognized as the Oklahoma Woman Veteran of the Year in 1998 by the War Veterans Commission of Oklahoma, Aragon said she was honored for her role in taking 100 military women to the opening ceremonies of the Women in Military Service for America Memorial in Arlington, Va. She was also instrumental in raising more than $18,000 for the Women’s Memorial in the name of the women who had served in the armed forces from Oklahoma.

“We were the only state to take a military group to march in the opening ceremonies,” she noted. “We were escorted in the grand opening ceremony by our adjutant general, the assistant adjutant general and the chief of staff of the Oklahoma Air National Guard.” Aragon also convinced State Sens. Enoch Kelly Haney and Kathleen Wilcoxson to participate in the memorial dedication.

The general said she never considered herself a “woman” soldier or airman, but became a “poster child” that young female soldiers and airman came to for advice and support. Retired and senior women veterans came to her when they needed help getting attention to issues, she said.

She was never a Girl Scout, but in 1998, she was named the Oklahoma’s Red Lands Council Girl Scouts Woman of the Year for being a role model and her support of the scouting as a teacher and principal. “I felt it was a great training ground for young girls,” Aragon said. “It gave them opportunities for structured activities and gave them pride in belonging to an organized group. I believe young girls need to experience the pride and discipline of serving others and learning teamwork.”

Aragon served as the mortuary officer for the Oklahoma City Murrah Federal Building bombing recovery 1995. “I helped make identification of bodies and notification to next of kin,” she said. “I was involved with notification to the next of kin of the children killed in the day care center there.”

Calling her husband, Greg, a “keeper,” she said he’s her best friend, closest confidant and strongest supporter. She said when they married on April 11, 1982, “He brought his four beautiful children into my life, and accepted my two little girls who call him their father. He allows me the flexibility to follow my dreams and goals.

“I love to golf, but I guess my passion is to spend time with my grandchildren,” Aragon said. “They range in age from 4 months to 18 years. When I married Greg, I inherited our four older children, and now we enjoy 7 wonderful grandchildren. We have two that live here in Oklahoma, two in New Mexico, two in Nevada, and one in Hawaii.”

On her military success, Aragon said, “I was in the right place and the right time, and had great bosses that let me open some doors to ‘diversity’ in the Oklahoma Military Department.http://archive.defense.gov/news/newsarticle.aspx?id=27720

Who is Trump playing to anyway? Germans and British who immigrated within the last 100 years? Looks like Trump is playing to lose. Many white Americans had ancestors who were forced out of their homelands and often came as indentured servants. They didn’t come to America “on the make” to see what they could get like Trump’s family and too many other recent immigrants did. They didn’t have a choice. They fought in the American Revolution and often have American Indian ancestry. African Americans also didn’t choose to migrate. Many records, where they even existed, were destroyed during the American Revolution or the Civil War or by climatic conditions. Yes, America has an immigration problem, and it seems to take recent immigrants like Donald Trump to notice. However, he’s both showing his ignorance of American history and pointing us straight to the fact that his wealth was built directly upon the western land grabs of American Indian Land. His personal wealth came from family-family bail-outs. American Indians have had an immigration problem for 400 years, but Trump’s grandfather was directly implicated and beneficiary to the theft of their last lands.

Choctaw were the first removed (from Mississippi). Many refused to go and have remained. Not all were given reservation status, however. After so many Choctaw refused to leave, the US government decided not to give the American Indians a choice regarding removal. Some still resisted as individuals or in groups, however. The Seminole fought to stay in their home. Read more here: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Indian_Removal_Act

According to an article in Indian Country Today:
The U.S. Census records starting with 1880 included a reference to Indians, but may or may not be accurate. Earlier records sometimes regard Indians or mixed bloods as MU (mulatto) and again are not necessarily accurate,” said Myra Vanderpool Gormley, a certified genealogist specializing in Cherokee and Native American history. “There are various Indian rolls from about 1885 that identify Indians by tribe and name. Most of them pertain to Indians living on reservations and not in the general population“From the mid-19th century, the beginning of the reservation period, up through the early 20th century, regardless of how people identified themselves, being classified by the U.S. government as an American Indian automatically curtailed one’s rights,…” Emphasis our own. Read the entire article here: http://indiancountrytodaymedianetwork.com/2012/05/14/elizabeth-warrens-genealogical-challenge-113019

Trump’s German grandfather directly benefitted from land grabs of American Indian land. His German grandfather loved America so much that he went home to marry a German wife and came back. Most people east of the Mississippi had to buy their land. Western lands were a massive give-away of American Indian land. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Homestead_Acts Under the 1872 mining act it remains a massive giveaway. Trump’s wealth came directly from this very recent exploitation: “Trump made his first fortune operating boom-town hotels, restaurants and brothels[1] in the northwestern United States and western Canada.[2] He later returned to Germany and married, before returning to the United States.

In 1885, at age 16, Trump emigrated from Bremen, Germany, to the United States aboard the steamship Eider, departing on October 7[4]:32 and arriving at the Castle Garden Emigrant Landing Depot in New York City on October 19. U.S. immigration records list his name as “Friedrich Trumpf”, last place of residence as “Kallstadt”, country of birth as “Germany”, and his occupation as “farmer”.“[6] https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Frederick_Trump (Look no further to see why the US can’t say much about Israel. The USA was a massive landgrab and with the Mining Law continues to be. It is a colonial settler state like Israel.)

Donald Trump’s “mother, Mary, was born in Tong on the Isle of Lewis in Scotland.[6] She emigrated to the United States in 1930 at age 18, and worked as a domestic servant for over four years.” https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Donald_Trump

Donald Trump’s father “was investigated by a U.S. Senate committee in 1954 for profiteering from public contracts, including overstating his Beach Haven building charges by US$3.7 million.[7] In testimony before the Senate Banking Committee in 1954, William F. McKenna, appointed to investigate “scandals” within the FHA, cited Fred C. Trump and his partner William Tomasello as examples of how profits were made by builders using the FHA. McKenna said the two paid $34,200 for a piece of land which they then rented to their corporation for over $60,000 per year in a 99-year lease, so that if the apartment they built on it ever defaulted, the FHA would owe $1.5 million on it. McKenna said that Trump and Tomasello then obtained loans for $3.5 million more than the apartments cost.[8] Trump testified before the Senate Banking Committee the following month as it investigated “windfall profits.” He said that builders would not have built apartments under an expired post-war loan insurance program if regulations had set inflexible limits on loans issued by the FHA.[9] In September 1954, following Trump’s testimony, 2,500 tenants of the Beachhaven apartments sued Trump and the FHA, claiming the builder made windfall profits and that the builder had received loans for $4 million more than the construction actually cost, and that rents were consequently inappropriately inflated.[10]https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fred_Trump

British Prime Minister Cameron’s family wealth came from exploiting America, too. Cameron’s ancestor just took his money and went back home: “His father, Ian, was born at Blairmore House near Huntly, Aberdeenshire, and died near Toulon, France, on 8 September 2010;[13] … Blairmore was built by Cameron’s great-great-grandfather, Alexander Geddes,[14] who had made a fortune in the grain trade in Chicago, Illinois, before returning to Scotland in the 1880s.[15]https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/David_Cameron
This must have been from speculating on the price of grain or otherwise ripping off American farmers. Some have speculated that Geddes’ money came from insurance monies subsequent to a fire. Considering that American farmers were in conflict with the Chicago grain merchants, the wikipedia version makes more sense.

Note that we have not vetted this New York Times story, but it appears interesting: