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Stop uranium projects: No to uranium exploration; no to uranium exploitation, in Quebec, First Nations say. They reaffirm their opposition to proposed uranium mining and will walk to Montreal to deliver their message.
"Road signs in Mistissini, showing street names and the "stop" directive in Cree (ᒋᐱᐦᒋ), English ("STOP") and French ("ARRÊT")".  Photo by P199, CC-BY-SA-3.0,
Road signs in Mistissini, showing street names and the “stop” directive in Cree (ᒋᐱᐦᒋ), English (“STOP”) and French (“ARRÊT”)“. Photo by P199, CC-BY-SA-3.0, “Mistissini (Cree: ᒥᔅᑎᓯᓃ/Mistisinî meaning Big Rock) is a Cree town located in the south-east corner of the largest natural lake in Quebec, Lake Mistassini (120 km long by 30 km wide).http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mistissini,_Quebec

Otish Mountains released to Public Domain via wikipedia http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Otish_Mountains

We consider that the risks related to uranium development are too great and the potential benefits to the community too uncertain to warrant our support.

One of our main preoccupations with uranium is that the residues from extracting and transforming the ore involve permanent management, yet no company can commit to being responsible for this waste beyond a human timeframe.“, July 14, 2014, Chief Richard Shecapio of the Cree Nation of Mistissini to Quebec’s BAPE.

I am here to affirm the Cree Nation’s position regarding uranium./ Uranium exploration, uranium exploitation and uranium waste emplacement are issues of pressing concern for my people. Our position is clear: uranium development is not welcome in our territory, Eeyou Istchee. We oppose uranium mining because the environmental risks and health risks posed by uranium mining are too high. Large quantities of radioactive waste must inevitably be produced in the course of mining uranium, and this waste will remain dangerous and toxic for hundreds of thousands of year. This is a burden on future generations that we are not prepared to assume.” Grand Chief Dr. Matthew Coon Come, May 14, 2014, to Quebec’s BAPE.

Northern Quebec Cree start 850 km trek to protest against uranium mining” By Caroline Nepton, CBC News Posted: Nov 21, 2014 2:41 ET, “We are the stewards of the land, therefore we have this responsibility to protect for the generations to come’- Joshua Iserhoff, Chair of the Cree Nation of the Youth Council” Article here: http://www.cbc.ca/news/aboriginal/northern-quebec-cree-start-850-km-trek-to-protest-against-uranium-mining-1.2844050

Read about how you can join in the “Stand Against Uranium Walk”, starting Sunday here: http://www.mistissini.ca/en/47-new-stand-against-uranium-walk.html (Probably you can join in as they move south, too, if you contact them.) Also see Facebook Page: https://www.facebook.com/jamesbaycreeagainsturanium

FINAL PHASE OF BAPE HEARINGS ON URANIUM IN EEYOU ISTCHEE
The Cree Nation reaffirms their opposition to uranium development on their land
” Posted: 2014-11-14 , article: http://www.gcc.ca/newsarticle.php?id=394

Cree leaders in Quebec use social media for campaign against uranium: Drumming up support against development in their territory” CBC News Posted: Oct 28, 2014 5:00 AM ET Last Updated: Oct 28, 2014 5:00 AM ET http://www.cbc.ca/news/aboriginal/cree-leaders-in-quebec-use-social-media-for-campaign-against-uranium-1.2809137

BAPE (Office of Public Hearings on the Environment, Quebec) Hearings continue up to December 15th, ending in Montreal from 1 pm to 7 pm at the Salle Ovation, Hyatt Regency Montréal, 1255 Jeanne-Mance (See www. bape.gouv.qc.ca for all locations and schedule.)

This is serious people as the proposed uranium mining is in the hydrological center of Quebec, and so could contaminate much of the Province.

On July 14, 2014 Chief Richard Shecapio of the Band Council of the Cree Nation of Mistissini expressed the following concerns regarding proposals for uranium mining, in his BAPE submission (Office of Public Hearings on the Environment, Quebec):

-As was concluded in 2012 at the CNSC hearings for the Strateco advanced exploration project, uranium development has no social acceptability in our community. This position will not change.

-As stewards of the land we have the responsibility to protect the greatest freshwater lake in the province, which behooves us to prevent uranium development from adding great and uncertain risk to the cumulative impacts from hydro, mining and road development on our traplines.

-Uranium development and its implications in terms of nuclear energy production and weapons manufacturing, is incompatible with Cree culture and values.

– lt will be essential for the BAPE to afford great consideration to the perspective of the Cree of Mistissini in its recommendations to the government, as we are the only community that has had experience with uranium projects that have gone through the review process related to advanced exploration, and have first-hand insights it has had about uranium development’s potential environmental, social and economie impacts and risks.

– We consider that the risks related to uranium development are too great and the potential benefits to the community too uncertain to warrant our support.

-One of our main preoccupations with uranium is that the residues from extracting and transforming the ore involve permanent management, yet no company can commit to being responsible for this waste beyond a human timeframe.

– Our opposition to uranium must not be understood as a repudiation of the mining industry, which is a core pillar of our objectives in terms of economic development and job creation. Many of our community members are trained for mining work, and eager to participate in the emergence of a responsible mining sector in Eeyou lstchee.

– Our decision to oppose uranium development has come from an extensive process of open and sustained community consultations, through which the men, women, eiders, hunters & trappers, youth and leaders of our community have gathered knowledge and held the discussions necessary to make an informed decision.

-The consultations regarding us have afforded us not only the opportunity to voice our refusai of uranium development, but also present our development strategy, based around responsible resource management, tourism development, and the development of local and Cree-owned service companies.

-As Cree culture and livelihoods are both interdependent and based on the availability of uncompromised and uncontaminated land and traditional foods, the prevention of uranium development is also a questions of preserving our way of life, regional economy and identity. Our freedom to live off and with the land is the cornerstone of this culture.

-The precautionary principle prevents us from going forward with uranium development, as the risks to the health and safety of Cree workers and to the environment are ill defined and uncertain.

This uncertainty must not be interpreted as an invitation to go forward in the absence of confirmed risk.

-The BAPE must take into account that this opposition to uranium development is not borne of Mistissini alone, but is the position of the Grand Council of the Cree and all Cree communities of Eeyou Istchee. We stand united as a Nation behind this position, which was also expressed at the BAPE hearings in Chisasibi.

-Our consideration of the potential impacts of uranium development are not focusing on the Strateco project specifically, but rather on the potential cumulative impacts from the severa! other extraction projects that could materialize from all of the exploration activity happening in the Otish Mountains.

-As the heads of many great rivers connecting the different Cree communities all stem from the Otish Mountains, any spill or leaching from uranium exploration or extraction activities could potentially contaminate a vast expanse of land and affect several communities.

-Recent floods along the Temiscamie river have illustrated some of the additional and unpredictable risk and potential devastation associated with climate change. We are not confident that the containment system for tailings could withstand extreme weather events over thousands and thousands of years.

– No development shall ever occur on Cree traditional land without our consent. These rights are granted to us by James Bay and Northern Quebec Agreement and its development project review process and shall not be denied.

– We regret the fact the DIVEX background document prepared for the BAPE on uranium has yet to be transmitted to the Cree Nation in a language that it can be comfortable with. Going forward it will be essential that the BAPE ensure that all documentation is available to the Cree in English, and in a timely fashion.

-As the Cree land-users and elders are the owners of the most specific, technical, integrated and wide-ranging data available on the environmental dynamics in the region of Eeyou lstchee. It is essential that the BAPE attribute great value to this information in the rendering of its recommendation to the government. Also, land-users should be engaged by the BAPE to coordinate the taking into consideration of this data with the BAPE and the James Bay Advisory Committee on the environment.

-As a First Nation, the Cree of Mistissini have aboriginal rights guaranteed by the Canadian constitution and international law. We also have treaty rights under the James Bay and Northern Quebec Agreement. This framework ensures that the Cree of Mistissini have the right to participate in decision making about issues impacting them. This right of free, prior and informed consent has been recognized by the Review Committee, COMEX, in its Environmental Review for the Matoush Uranium Exploration Project in July 2011.” (Note the failure of Quebec to provide the BAPE environmental report in English, in a timely manner – if at all. The translation was to be ready in April and the Chief is writing in July. Most of the authors of the report attended English universities, such as McGill, so could have written a bilingual document. Quebec is a French-speaking Province within a bilingual nation (Canada). However, the First Nations appear generally to prefer English over French. Ironically, it is the English speaking Canadian government which approved-tried to force uranium mining upon the First Nations in Quebec, whereas the French speaking Quebec Nationalist (PQ) Pequistes imposed the uranium mining moratorium).

Grand Chief Dr. Matthew Coon Come, about Uranium Mining, from:
Speaking notes of Grand Chief Dr. Matthew Coon Come Presentation to the BAPE Montreal, May 20, 2014

… I am here to affirm the Cree Nation’s position regarding uranium.

Uranium exploration, uranium exploitation and uranium waste emplacement are issues of pressing concern for my people. Our position is clear: uranium development is not welcome in our territory, Eeyou Istchee. We oppose uranium mining because the environmental risks and health risks posed by uranium mining are too high. Large quantities of radioactive waste must inevitably be produced in the course of mining uranium, and this waste will remain dangerous and toxic for hundreds of thousands of year. This is a burden on future generations that we are not prepared to assume.

Our opposition to uranium mining stems from our connection to the land, and to the animals and plant life that rely on that land.” Read the entire speech here: http://www.gcc.ca/newsarticle.php?id=362

We hope that they are really very carefully examining the repercussions of other types of mining. If there is uranium in the area, then it is probably mixed in with other mineral resources and will either remain in the tailings or require removal as by-product. As well, we hope they will only do underground mining and not surface mining, if they insist on doing mining.

On November 20, 2014, Honeywell Metropolis sent a letter to its employees (presumably not those locked-out) saying that it would be shutdown for the first few months of 2015, citing routine maintenance and “soft” uranium hex end markets (i.e. more sellers than buyers) due to nuclear slowdown post-Fukushima and US government inventory. So, all the more reason not to mine and especially such low grade. Strateco claims that its proposed mines are high grade, but the grades they list are not. High grade are the Cameco mines in Saskatechewan.

Australian Mining Company Toro has purchased part of Strateco and expressed interest in Matoush.

Mining companies have laid Australia to waste and continue to do so, turning its fragile environment increasingly into desert. Apparently not satisfied with destroying Australia, they are trying to destroy Canada too. What part of NO do these people not understand?

On November 03, 2014 acquisition of 19.8% of Strateco by Toro Energy was announced. Toro is reported as being interested in the Matoush project, by Strateco’s President-CEO, Guy Hébert, in a press release. Frighteningly it is stated that Toro’s experience in Wiluna project, “an area formerly under moratorium, will certainly be an asset for Strateco“. They are also interested in uranium projects in Saskatchewan.

Toro’s project in an ecologically sensitive part of Australia is being opposed there:
Too much danger, too little detail: EPA urged to give red light to WA yellowcake plan” October 20th 2014, Media Release,
National and state environment and Aboriginal groups have today called on the WA Environment Protection Agency to halt any further consideration of new proposals for uranium mining near Wiluna.

Uranium hopeful Toro Energy is seeking EPA approval for the recently acquired mining leases at Lake Maitland and Millipede to be included in the company’s wider operations at Wiluna – a move strongly contested by the joint groups in a submission to the EPA today.

“Toro’s plan is low on detail but high on danger,” said WA Conservation Council campaigner Mia Pepper. “The company has failed to address key issues, including impacts on water and the long term management of radioactive tailings. Toro is now looking at four separate mines across two lake systems involving fifty million tonnes of radioactive mine waste and using nearly seven million litres of water a day – with plans to expand further across the region. The proposal to mine uranium at Wiluna has gone from bad to worse.
– See more at: http://ccwa.org.au/media/too-much-danger-too-little-detail-epa-urged-give-red-light-wa-yellowcake-plan

NO IS NO!