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Southward spreading of the Fukushima-derived radiocesium across the Kuroshio Extension in the North Pacific by Yuichiro Kumamoto1, Michio Aoyama, et. al.  2014 map
Map from Yuichiro Kumamotol, et. al. 2014 (see in article below)

Our Preface to the article
The below 2014 article, by Yuichiro Kumamotol, et. al., is based on testing done about 10 months after the accident, in early 2012. Thus, it does not include everything that has gone into the water. The most interesting part about it is movement of radionuclides into and within the ocean. How much was emitted may never be known.

Note below that: “the total amounts of 134Cs and 137Cs released from FNPP1 were equivalent.” Notice the prefixes, e.g. PBq is 1,000,000,000,000,000 Bequerels = radioactive emissions (disintegrations) per second. TBq is 1,000,000,000,000 Bequerels, i.e. 1 trillion (radioactive) disintegrations per second. P for Peta and T for Tera. Recall that Cesium 134 and Cesium 137 are not the only radionuclides emitted.

Recall that the number of years to reach 0.0015% of the original quantity is Half Life x 16. Thus, Cesium 134, half life 2 years, will be in the environment for over 32 years; Cesium 137, half life of 30 years will be in the environment for over 480 years. 480 years ago was 1534, to give some perspective, of the sort never given by the nuclear power industry.

If Fukushima had happened in 1534, there would still be 0.0015% of the Cesium 137 left. In 1534, Luther’s complete translation of the entire Bible into German was printed in Wittenberg.
Luther Bible 1534 public domain via wikimedia
1534 was an eventful year, as can be seen at the bottom of this post, after the article. Henry VIII declared himself head of the Church of England, among other things.
Southward spreading of the Fukushima-derived radiocesium across the Kuroshio Extension in the North Pacific  Yuichiro Kumamoto, Michio Aoyama et. al. 2014
Southward spreading of the Fukushima-derived radiocesium across the Kuroshio Extension in the North Pacific  Yuichiro Kumamoto, Michio Aoyama, et al. p. 2
Southward spreading of the Fukushima-derived radiocesium across the Kuroshio Extension in the North Pacific, Yuichiro Kumamoto, Michio Aoyama et. al. 2014, p. 3
Southward spreading of the Fukushima-derived radiocesium across the Kuroshio Extension in the North Pacific, Yuichiro Kumamoto, Michio Aoyama et. al. 2014, p. 4
Southward spreading of the Fukushima-derived radiocesium across the Kuroshio Extension in the North Pacific, Yuichiro Kumamoto, Michio Aoyama et. al. 2014, p. 5
Southward spreading of the Fukushima-derived radiocesium across the Kuroshio Extension in the North Pacific, Yuichiro Kumamoto, Michio Aoyama et. al. 2014, p. 6
Southward spreading of the Fukushima-derived radiocesium across the Kuroshio Extension in the North Pacific, Yuichiro Kumamoto, Michio Aoyama et. al. 2014, p. 7
Southward spreading of the Fukushima-derived radiocesium across the Kuroshio Extension in the North Pacific, Yuichiro Kumamoto, Michio Aoyama et. al. 2014, p. 8
Southward spreading of the Fukushima-derived radiocesium across the Kuroshio Extension in the North Pacific, Yuichiro Kumamoto, Michio Aoyama et. al. 2014
(Highlight-underline Emphasis Added to original)
Full Original found here: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3940975/
(Text options include pdf)

We underlined Ken Buessler, of WHOI-MIT, in the text because he appears to have decided from almost the beginning that Fukushima was no problem. Worse, he has run around trying to scare people out of eating bananas and other potassium rich food, which is a double crime. Radioactive potassium makes up .00012 of all natural potassium. The body always has the same amount of potassium. So, you will not get more radioactive by eating more bananas (unless they have radiocesium in them)! And, potassium is essential for life. Potassium is essential for nerve function. Without proper nerve function, you die. Too much or too little potassium can kill you. Hence, by discouraging people from eating potassium rich food Buessler is committing attempted murder. No joke. Potassium is that important! Too little can be dangerous, as can too much. So, potassium needs to come from your food, except when a small part of a multi-vitamin or under medical supervision. Also, cesium mimics potassium in the body. And, the more radioactive cesium you eat the more radioactive you can become for up to 2 years until you reach a steady state of what is in the environment. By replacing potassium in the body, cesium can act as a chemical poison, as well as a radiological one. When plants are deficient in potassium they pick up more cesium. Thus, to try to block radioactive cesium, farmers put potassium rich fertilizer on their fields. One can hope that when given the choice that the human body will choose potassium over cesium. Thus, potassium rich foods could help protect from radiation, as well as being necessary for life. This exacerbates the crime being committed by Buessler and all of those trying to scare people away from bananas and other potassium rich foods. Some surely do it by ignorance. Given Buessler’s dissertation on testing for plutonium (which he never speaks of), it’s pretty clear he is trying to confuse and deceive people.

NOAA Ocean Gyres
NOAA image via wikimedia
The Kuroshio Current is the west side of the clockwise North Pacific ocean gyre
The Kuroshio (黒潮 [ku͍ɽoɕio] “Black Tide”) is a north-flowing ocean current on the west side of the North Pacific Ocean. It is similar to the Gulf Stream in the North Atlantic and is part of the North Pacific ocean gyre. Like the Gulf stream, it is a strong western boundary current.http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kuroshio_Current

Events from 1534:
January–June
January 15 – Parliament of England passes the Act Respecting the Oath to the Succession recognising the marriage of Henry VIII and Anne Boleyn, and their children as the legitimate heirs to the throne.[1]
February 27 – A group of Anabaptists, led by Jan Matthys, seize Münster in Westphalia and declare it “The New Jerusalem”, begin to exile dissenters and forcibly baptize all others.
April 5 (Easter Sunday) – Anabaptist Jan Matthys is killed by the Landsknechte, who lay siege to Münster on the day he predicted as The Second Coming of Christ. His follower John of Leiden takes control of the city.
April 7 – Sir Thomas More confined in the Tower of London
May 10 – Jacques Cartier explores Newfoundland while searching for the Northwest Passage.
June 9 – Jacques Cartier is the first European to discover the Saint Lawrence River.
June 23 – Copenhagen opens its gates to Count Christopher of Oldenburg leading the army of Lübeck (and the Hanseatic League), nominally in the interests of the deposed King Christian II of Denmark. The surrenders of Copenhagen and, a few days later, of Malmö represent the high point of the Count’s War for the forces of the League. These victories presumably lead the Danish nobility to recognize Christian III as King on July 4.[2][3]
June 29 – Jacques Cartier discovers Prince Edward Island, Canada.
July–December
July 4 – Election of Christian III as King of Denmark and Norway in the town of Rye.
July 7 – The first known exchange occurs between Europeans and natives of the Gulf of St. Lawrence, in New Brunswick.
August 15 – Ignatius of Loyola and six others take the vows that lead to the establishment of the Society of Jesus in Montmartre (Paris).
August 26 – Piero de Ponte becomes the 45th Grandmaster of the Knights Hospitaller.
October 13 – Pope Paul III succeeds Pope Clement VII as the 220th pope.
October 18 – Huguenots post placards all over France attacking the Catholic Mass, provoking a violent sectarian reaction.
November 3 –December 18 – The English Reformation Parliament passes the Act of Supremacy establishing Henry VIII as supreme head of the Church of England.[1]
December 6 – Over 200 Spanish settlers led by conquistador Sebastián de Belalcázar found what is now Quito, Ecuador.
Date unknown
Act for the Submission of the Clergy confirmed by the Parliament of England, requiring churchmen to submit to the king and forbidding the publication of ecclesiastical laws without royal permission.
Manco Inca Yupanqui is crowned as Sapa Inca in Cusco, Peru by Spanish conquistador Francisco Pizarro in succession to his brother Túpac Huallpa (d. October 1533).
Cambridge University Press is given a Royal Charter by Henry VIII of England and becomes the first of the privileged presses.
Gargantua is published by François Rabelais.
Martin Luther’s translation of the complete Christian Bible into German is printed by Hans Lufft in Wittenberg, adding the Old Testament and Apocrypha to Luther’s 1522 translation of the New Testament and including woodcut illustrations.
First book printed in Yiddish (in Kraków), Mirkevet ha-Mishneh, a Tanakh concordance by rabbi Asher Anchel, translating difficult phrases in biblical Hebrew.[4]
” References at link: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/1534