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A few months after the current CEO of Honeywell, Dave Cote, apparent buddy of President Obama, took over Honeywell in July of 2002, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/David_M._Cote Honeywell decided to shut down the part of their Metropolis, Illinois facility, which processed the corrosive “KOH mud”, consisting of uranium and potassium hydroxide (KOH), byproduct in the “conversion process” (one stage in turning uranium to fuel for nuclear power plants). Thus, this uranium-KOH slurry started accumulating at Honeywell’s Metropolis, Illinois “Conversion” Facility, on the Ohio River, slightly upriver from the Mississippi River.
Metropolis, IL and Ohio-Miss Rivers

Honeywell is one of the contractors at the Savannah River site, in South Carolina (http://www.srs.gov/general/news/factsheets/srs.pdf) where the German government arrogantly wants to send some of its high level nuclear waste. And, insanely, the US government may take it, if people don’t object. (To object contact Andrew Grainger: drew.grainger@srs.gov before 21 July 2014) Does Obama’s wanting to import high level German radioactive waste to Savannah River have something to do with Obama’s relationship with David Cote and with Honeywell? Obama was a major recipient of Honeywell affiliated campaign donations: http://influenceexplorer.com/organization/honeywell-international/2d625ce311ff4aa091ae66f440c2a62f

Some workers at the Metropolis, Illinois site explained that in 2002 Honeywell “laid off all the workers in the Uranium Recovery and Wet Process areas of the plant. These units processed the waste in question…“. However, it appears that “Honeywell wanted to maximize profits and the two areas of the plant didn’t directly turn a profit for them“. And, so “Drums of toxic potassium hydroxide or KOH mud began to accumulate almost immediately throughout the plant“. Hence, they believed that: “The entire situation stems from Honeywell’s greed“. http://usw7-669.com/story/march-archive It is interesting to note that David Cote became CEO in July of 2002 and the Uranium Recovery and Wet Process area of the plant was shut in November of 2002.

UF6 Conversion Flowsheet http://www.cdc.gov/niosh/ocas/pdfs/tbd/allied-r2.pdf

According to the US government-EPA:
Summary of Criminal Prosecutions

FISCAL YEAR: 2011
1. PRINCIPAL DEFENDANT: Honeywell Metropolis Works
S.D. Illinois 11-CR-40006-JPG
Honeywell, a Delaware corporation with corporate headquarters in Morristown, N.J., owns and operates a uranium hexafluoride (UF6) conversion facility in Massac County, Ill., near the city of Metropolis and the Ohio River. Honeywell is licensed by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission to possess and otherwise manage natural uranium, which it converts into UF6 for nuclear fuel. The Metropolis facility is the only facility in the United States to convert natural uranium into UF6.

At the Metropolis facility, air emissions from the UF6 conversion process are scrubbed with potassium hydroxide (KOH) prior to discharge. As a result of this process, KOH scrubbers and associated equipment accumulate uranium compounds that settle out of the liquid and are pumped as a slurry into 55-gallon drums. The drummed material, called “KOH mud” and consisting of uranium and KOH, has a pH greater than or equal to 12.5.

In November 2002, Honeywell shut down part of the wet reclamation process it used to reclaim the uranium from the KOH mud, knowing that previously accumulated drums of KOH mud and any additional drums of KOH mud generated thereafter would have to be stored onsite until such time as the wet reclamation process was restarted. Honeywell also knew that, because the pH of KOH mud generated at the facility was greater than or equal to 12.5, it is classified as corrosive hazardous waste under regulations issued pursuant to RCRA. Therefore, Honeywell needed, but did not have, a RCRA permit to store any drums of KOH mud at its facility longer than 90 days.

In July 2007 Honeywell requested a modification of its RCRA permit from the Illinois Environmental Protection Agency (IEPA) so that it could store drums of KOH mud. IEPA issued Honeywell a modified permit in July 2008, allowing Honeywell to store drums containing KOH mud only in a KOH container storage area designed to contain any spills, leaks, or precipitation that accumulates in the drum storage area. By September 2008 Honeywell had accumulated more than 7,000 drums of KOH mud. In April 2009, EPA special agents conducted a search warrant and found nearly 7,500 illegally stored drums containing waste that was both radioactive and hazardous. Honeywell began storing the KOH mud drums in compliance with the terms of its RCRA permit in approximately March 2010.
March 11, 2011
Honeywell was charged with one count of violating RCRA {42 U.S.C. 6925 {permit violation – knowingly storing hazardous waste without a permit }.
Honeywell pled guilty and was sentenced to 60 months probation and ordered to pay an $11.8 million federal fine. Honeywell will also develop, fund, and implement a household hazardous waste collection program and arrange for proper treatment, transportation, and disposal of this waste collected during at least 8 collection events over a 2 year period, at a cost of approximately $200,000.

CITATION: 42 U.S.C. 6925
STATUTE: Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA)
” (Emphasis added) http://cfpub.epa.gov/compliance/criminal_prosecution/index.cfm?action=3&prosecution_summary_id=2185

According to the US Department of Justice:
March 11, 2011
Honeywell was charged with one count of violating RCRA {42 U.S.C. 6925 {permit violation – knowingly storing hazardous waste without a permit}.

Honeywell pled guilty and was sentenced to 60 months probation and ordered to pay an $11.8 million federal fine. Honeywell will also develop, fund, and implement a household hazardous waste collection program and arrange for proper treatment, transportation, and disposal of this waste collected during at least 8 collection events over a 2 year period, at a cost of approximately $200,000.

Department of Justice
Office of Public Affairs
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Friday, March 11, 2011
Honeywell Pleads Guilty in Illinois to Illegal Storage of Hazardous Waste
Corporation Sentenced to Pay $11.8 Million Criminal Fine
WASHINGTON – Honeywell International Inc. pleaded guilty today in federal district court in Benton, Ill., to one felony offense for knowingly storing hazardous waste without a permit in violation of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). Honeywell was also sentenced today to pay a criminal fine in the amount of $11.8 million.

“Today, Honeywell must account for its knowing violation of a federal law that protects the public from exposure to hazardous waste containing radioactive material,” said Ignacia S. Moreno, Assistant Attorney General for the Environment and Natural Resources Division of the Department of Justice. “All companies who generate hazardous waste must have a permit to store the waste and, when granted a permit under RCRA, must fully comply with its requirements or they will be prosecuted.”

The citizens of Southern Illinois should not and will not tolerate improper storage of hazardous wastes so near their homes and businesses,” said Stephen R. Wigginton, U.S. Attorney for the Southern District of Illinois. U.S. Attorney Wigginton noted that he will “continue to seek out and prosecute environmental criminals on behalf of the residents of the Southern District of Illinois in order to insure the environmental safety of our communities.”

“The defendant’s illegal storage practices put employees at risk of exposure to radioactive and hazardous materials,” said Cynthia Giles, assistant administrator for EPA’s Office of Enforcement and Compliance Assurance. “Today’s plea agreement and sentencing shows that those who try to circumvent the law and place people’s health and the environment at risk will be vigorously prosecuted.”

Honeywell, a Delaware corporation with corporate headquarters in Morristown, N.J., owns and operates a uranium hexafluoride (UF6) conversion facility in Massac County, Ill., near the city of Metropolis and the Ohio River. Honeywell is licensed by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission to possess and otherwise manage natural uranium, which it converts into UF6 for nuclear fuel. The Metropolis facility is the only facility in the United States to convert natural uranium into UF6.

At the Metropolis facility, air emissions from the UF6 conversion process are scrubbed with potassium hydroxide (KOH) prior to discharge. As a result of this process, KOH scrubbers and associated equipment accumulate uranium compounds that settle out of the liquid and are pumped as a slurry into 55-gallon drums. The drummed material, called “KOH mud” and consisting of uranium and KOH, has a pH greater than or equal to 12.5.

In November 2002, Honeywell shut down part of the wet reclamation process it used to reclaim the uranium from the KOH mud, knowing that previously accumulated drums of KOH mud and any additional drums of KOH mud generated thereafter would have to be stored onsite until such time as the wet reclamation process was restarted. Honeywell also knew that, because the pH of KOH mud generated at the facility was greater than or equal to 12.5, it is classified as corrosive hazardous waste under regulations issued pursuant to RCRA. Therefore, Honeywell needed, but did not have, a RCRA permit to store any drums of KOH mud at its facility longer than 90 days.

In July 2007, Honeywell requested a modification of its RCRA permit from the Illinois Environmental Protection Agency (IEPA) so that they could store drums of KOH mud. IEPA issued Honeywell a modified permit in July 2008, allowing Honeywell to store drums containing KOH mud only in a KOH container storage area designed to contain any spills, leaks or precipitation that accumulates in the drum storage area. By September 2008, Honeywell had accumulated over 7,000 drums of KOH mud. In April 2009, EPA special agents conducted a search warrant and found nearly 7,500 illegally stored drums containing waste that was both radioactive and hazardous. Honeywell began storing the KOH mud drums in compliance with the terms of its RCRA permit in approximately March 2010.

In accordance with the terms of the criminal plea agreement, Honeywell will serve a five-year term of probation. As a condition of probation, Honeywell must comply with the terms of the interim consent order entered into with the Illinois Attorney General’s Office and the Illinois Environmental Protection Agency, filed on April 21, 2010, and any subsequent revisions, which imposes a schedule for the processing of KOH mud. As a further condition of probation, Honeywell must implement a community service project in the community surrounding the Metropolis facility, whereby Honeywell will develop, fund and implement a household hazardous waste collection program and arrange for proper treatment, transportation and disposal of this waste collected during at least eight collection events over a two-year period, at a cost of approximately $200,000.

The case was investigated by the Environmental Protection Agency Criminal Investigation Division. It was prosecuted by … the Environmental Crimes Section of the Department of Justice Environment and Natural Resources Division and by … the U.S. Attorney’s Office for the Southern District of Illinois.
11-314 Environment and Natural Resources Division
” (Emphasis added) http://www.justice.gov/opa/pr/2011/March/11-enrd-314.html

As the local union observes: “It is a known fact that production and maintenance workers from atomic plants have a much higher cancer rate than non-atomic workers.http://usw7-669.com/sites/usw7-669.com/files/health-just_the_facts.pdf

Due to the local union (USW7-669) efforts to protect retiree healthcare and pension, they were locked out of their workplace by Honeywell from June 28th, 2010 to August 2nd, 2011. And, apparently because they “Won’t Let Honeywell Put Profits Before Worker Safety.http://usw7-669.com

During the contract negotiations running up to the lockout, on 16th and 17th June 2010, the Union noted: “Talks are stalled on retiree healthcare. It looks like it is going to be one of the big sticking points of this negotiation. The company believes that you don’t deserve healthcare when you retire …. after working with Uranium, hazardous waste, and Asbestos for 20 + years… 16 June 2010 Talks are continuing on pensions and retiree healthcare. Things are moving very slow because of the company’s negotiator…http://usw7-669.com/story/june-archive
In the same time period, Honeywell CEO, David Cote was making an estimated
$37 million (2011) and Honeywell paid “a 2 percent tax rate between 2008 and 2011, according to Citizens for Tax Justice, while receiving $1.7 billion in tax subsidies“. Cote “has said that the corporate tax rate should be zero.” (Garofalo, Pat, “Super Wealthy CEO Admits Spending Cuts Will Hurt The Economy, Wants Them To Happen Anyway” (2013 Feb. 7) http://thinkprogress.org/economy/2013/02/07/1557261/honeywell-ceo-cut-spending/

The local USW Union, made the following observations about the March 11, 2011 ruling: “… Within weeks of OSHA obtaining a warrant before the Judge and then Honeywell subsequently violating that warrant,… Honeywell pled guilty to a felony count of Illegally storing hazardous waste at the Metropolis facility…

They note that in 2002, Honeywell “laid off all the workers in the Uranium Recovery and Wet Process areas of the plant. These units processed the waste in question,…“. But, it appears that “Honeywell wanted to maximize profits and the two areas of the plant didn’t directly turn a profit for them. Drums of toxic potassium hydroxide or KOH mud began to accumulate almost immediately throughout the plant. After a short amount of time, Honeywell managers were instructing workers to store the drums in one particular area of the plant, reassuring everyone that they were being stored legally. Employees knew something was wrong.

The hourly employees of the union kept asking questions about the legality of storing such materials, which could not be safely contained in metal drums because it was so corrosive. The material had the ability to rust through the wall of a metal drum within just a few short months. In 2008, Dave Cote himself was touring the Metropolis facility. He participated in a town-hall meeting, which all employees were invited to. During the town-hall meeting, which was broadcast live to other Honeywell facilities, Cote was asked by a union employee, “How can we be expected to follow Honeywell’s code of conduct, when we are being told by supervisors to store this material illegally?

Cote was visually angry about the question and answered that he was not aware of the situation. Around that time was when the whistle blew. Honeywell claims that they “self reported” the violation on a Securities and Exchange Commission document. While not a complete lie, the claim of self reporting is only about half true… It was after someone reviewing that document noticed that the amount of KOH muds was grossly over the allowed amount that the EPA busted in the plant armed, with warrants to gather information and see what was going on. That was the result of employees reporting the violations, not Honeywell.

What remains to be seen is if nearly 12 million dollars is enough to discourage Honeywell from engaging in future similar activity, or if they will continue to chalk such violations up as the price of doing business. It is by no coincidence that the turnover is so high for Environmental Managers at the plant; the fear of going to prison usually leads to them looking for alternative employment…
” (Emphasis added; Read the entire article (and all about the lockout of workers and more) here: http://usw7-669.com/story/march-archiveHoneywell pleads guilty to felony, fined $11.8 Million! 03/14/2011

Full EPA Press Release:
Honeywell Pleads Guilty in Illinois to Illegal Storage of Hazardous Waste / Corporation sentenced to pay $11.8 million criminal fine
Release Date: 03/11/2011

WASHINGTON – Honeywell International Inc. pleaded guilty today in federal district court in Benton, Ill., to one felony offense for knowingly storing hazardous waste without a permit in violation of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). Honeywell was also sentenced today to pay a criminal fine in the amount of $11.8 million.

“The defendant’s illegal storage practices put employees at risk of exposure to radioactive and hazardous materials,” said Cynthia Giles, assistant administrator for EPA’s Office of Enforcement and Compliance Assurance. “Today’s plea agreement and sentencing shows that those who try to circumvent the law and place people’s health and the environment at risk will be vigorously prosecuted.”

“Today, Honeywell must account for its knowing violation of a federal law that protects the public from exposure to hazardous waste containing radioactive material,” said Ignacia S. Moreno, assistant attorney general for the Environment and Natural Resources Division of the Department of Justice. “All companies who generate hazardous waste must have a permit to store the waste and, when granted a permit under RCRA, must fully comply with its requirements or they will be prosecuted.”

Honeywell, a Delaware corporation with corporate headquarters in Morristown, N.J., owns and operates a uranium hexafluoride (UF6) conversion facility in Massac County, Ill., near the city of Metropolis and the Ohio River. Honeywell is licensed by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission to possess and otherwise manage natural uranium, which it converts into UF6 for nuclear fuel. The Metropolis facility is the only facility in the United States to convert natural uranium into UF6.

At the Metropolis facility, air emissions from the UF6 conversion process are scrubbed with potassium hydroxide (KOH) prior to discharge. As a result of this process, KOH scrubbers and associated equipment accumulate uranium compounds that settle out of the liquid and are pumped as a slurry into 55-gallon drums. The drummed material, called “KOH mud” and consisting of uranium and KOH, has a pH greater than or equal to 12.5.

In November 2002, Honeywell shut down part of the wet reclamation process it used to reclaim the uranium from the KOH mud, knowing that previously accumulated drums of KOH mud and any additional drums of KOH mud generated thereafter would have to be stored onsite until such time as the wet reclamation process was restarted. Honeywell also knew that, because the pH of KOH mud generated at the facility was greater than or equal to 12.5, it is classified as corrosive hazardous waste under regulations issued pursuant to RCRA. Therefore, Honeywell needed, but did not have, a RCRA permit to store any drums of KOH mud at its facility longer than 90 days.

In July 2007 Honeywell requested a modification of its RCRA permit from the Illinois Environmental Protection Agency (IEPA) so that it could store drums of KOH mud. IEPA issued Honeywell a modified permit in July 2008, allowing Honeywell to store drums containing KOH mud only in a KOH container storage area designed to contain any spills, leaks, or precipitation that accumulates in the drum storage area. By September 2008 Honeywell had accumulated more than 7,000 drums of KOH mud. In April 2009, EPA special agents conducted a search warrant and found nearly 7,500 illegally stored drums containing waste that was both radioactive and hazardous. Honeywell began storing the KOH mud drums in compliance with the terms of its RCRA permit in approximately March 2010.

In accordance with the terms of the criminal plea agreement, Honeywell will serve a five-year term of probation. As a condition of probation, Honeywell must comply with the terms of the interim consent order entered into with the Illinois Attorney General’s Office and the Illinois Environmental Protection Agency, filed on April 21, 2010, and any subsequent revisions, which imposes a schedule for the processing of KOH mud. As a further condition of probation, Honeywell must implement a community service project in the community surrounding the Metropolis facility, whereby Honeywell will develop, fund, and implement a household hazardous waste collection program and arrange for proper treatment, transportation, and disposal of this waste collected during at least eight collection events over a two year period, at a cost of approximately $200,000.” (Emphasis added) http://yosemite.epa.gov/opa/admpress.nsf/d0cf6618525a9efb85257359003fb69d/def2f68123e736b38525785000721a93!OpenDocument