Tags

, , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

This post continues here: https://miningawareness.wordpress.com/2014/01/10/the-ongoing-saga-12-news-updates-tidbits-trivia/
It is a continuation of: https://miningawareness.wordpress.com/2013/12/28/the-ongoing-saga-10-news-updates-tidbits-trivia/

The most recent update is on top. The earliest update is at the bottom.

Thursday, 9 January 2014

We have updated Radioactive Reindeer, Part II. https://miningawareness.wordpress.com/2014/01/07/radioactive-reindeer-part-ii/ Most of the post is actually on radioactive iodine.

Major news is early this morning there was an explosion at a Mitsubishi chemical plant in western Japan. A lab exploded last night in San Francisco. Unfortunately we have no time to format news right now. We will add other news and comment later.
Five dead after explosion at Mitsubishi Materials plant in Japan -NHK
Posted:Thu, 09 Jan 2014 01:59:50 -0500
TOKYO, Jan 9 (Reuters) – Five people died in an explosion at a Mitsubishi Materials Corp chemicals plant in western Japan on Thursday, national broadcaster NHK reported, citing local police. http://feeds.reuters.com/~r/reuters/basicmaterialsNews/~3/c8QEG0rHw9U/mitsubishimaterials-explosion-idUSL3N0KJ1XS20140109

UPDATE 2-Two people hurt in explosion at lab near San Francisco
Posted:Wed, 08 Jan 2014 20:30:20 -0500
SAN FRANCISCO, Jan 8 (Reuters) – Two people were hurt on Wednesday in an explosion at an Amgen laboratory in the San Francisco Bay Area, the biotechnology company and a South San Francisco Fire Department official said
“. http://feeds.reuters.com/~r/reuters/basicmaterialsNews/~3/_xD_ut1nTs8/usa-lab-explosion-idUSL2N0KJ01W20140109

Update 1, Wednesday, 8 January 2014

Trees Being Sucked into Collapsing Salt Dome!
January 5, 2014, Bayou Corne, Louisiana
Does a salt dome really look like the right place for nuclear waste, as has been suggested in the past for both the US and Germany!? Both countries seem to still have it on the table too! This collapsing salt dome-sinkhole has radioactive NORM, a by-product of the oil and gas industry.

Wednesday, 8 January 2014

Yet another rail derailment and fire, this one causing evacuations in a tiny town in New Brunswick, Canada.
Evacuations ordered after freight train derails, catches fire in N.B. CTVNews.ca Staff Tuesday, January 7, 2014
“Approximately two dozen homes in northern New Brunswick have been evacuated after a CN freight train jumped the tracks and caught fire.
Full article here: http://www.ctvnews.ca/canada/evacuations-ordered-after-freight-train-derails-catches-fire-in-n-b-1.1628335 Reuters news feed coverage below.

Sardine Warnings

Many are worrying that the disappearance of sardines is caused by Fukushima. Sardine disappearance off of the US-Canadian coast is now in the mainstream media, as seen below. While this looks like common sense, it may well be a combination of factors and most importantly a warning-reminder of Fukushima’s potential impacts, and that it must be handled the best way possible. They must stop leakage of radiation into the ocean and air – to the extent possible. But, “to the extent possible” cannot be used as a loophole for half-measures! It is a call to action. The fact that Hanford is leaking in the Pacific Northwest, as well as other leaking sites, both known and unknown, should not be forgotten either.

Around 1992, when there was no longer a “Cold War”, a study was done which suggested that sardine populations wax and wane in cycles going back to ancient times. In the World War I and II period canned sardines were used to feed the troops. One cannot help, however, but wonder if the sardine collapse was related in some way to the use of atomic weapons and the period of above ground and under water nuclear testing. More likely it was a combination of factors: cycles, overfishing and nuclear weapons. If sardines are already at a low, they are even more at risk from radiation. It is unclear if anchovies were similarly impacted, however. Below is some information that those who are interested can sort through. If we wait to organize it for a post it may get lost, as so much of our info does.

From the Los Angeles Times:
West Coast sardine crash could radiate throughout ecosystem: If sardine populations don’t recover soon, experts warn, the West Coast’s marine mammals, seabirds and fishermen could suffer for years.” By Tony Barboza, LA Times, January 5, 2014. From the article:
Now, they say, there is evidence some ocean predators are starving without sardines. Scarcity of prey is the leading theory behind the 1,600 malnourished sea lion pups that washed up along beaches from Santa Barbara to San Diego in early 2013, said Sharon Melin, a wildlife biologist at the National Marine Fisheries Service.” (Entire article online. Because of linking issues we let you search).

Historic research of sardine population:
BAUMGARTNER ET AL.: “HISTORY OF PACIFIC SARDINE AND NORTHERN ANCHOVY POPULATIONS” CalCOFl Rep., Vol. 33,1992. “RECONSTRUCTION OF THE HISTORY OF PACIFIC SARDINE AND NORTHERN ANCHOVY POPULATIONS OVER THE PAST TWO MILLENNIA FROM SEDIMENTS OF THE SANTA BARBARA BASIN, CALIFORNIAhttp://www.calcofi.org/publications/calcofireports/v33/Vol_33_Baumgartner_etal.pdf
Another article is here: http://calcofi.ucsd.edu/newhome/publications/CalCOFI_Reports/v34/pdfs/Vol_34_Holmgren___Baumgartner.pdf

COLLAPSE OF THE CALIFORNIA SARDINE FISHERY” CalCOFI Rep., Vol. XXIII, 1982 “The Collapse of the California Sardine Fishery What Have We learned?” By JOHN RADOVICH http://calcofi.ucsd.edu/newhome/publications/CalCOFI_Reports/v23/pdfs/Vol_23_Radovich.pdf From the article:
After 50 years of fishing for the Pacific sardine, Sardinops sagax (Jenyns), a moratorium on landings was imposed by the California Legislature in 1967, thus bringing to an end yet another act of one of the more emotionally charged fisheries exploitation-conservation controversies of the 20th century. By the time the moratorium was imposed, however, the sardine fishery in southern California had already collapsed. The sardine fisheries in the northwest had long since ceased to exist with sardines last landed in British Columbia in the 1947-1948 season, in Oregon and Washington in the 1948-1949 season, and in San Francisco Bay in the 1951-1952 season (Table 1).” Entire article here:
http://calcofi.ucsd.edu/newhome/publications/CalCOFI_Reports/v23/pdfs/Vol_23_Radovich.pdf (NB: Hiroshima-Nagasaki, August 1945) See: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Underwater_explosion http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nuclear_weapons_testing http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Atomic_bombings_of_Hiroshima_and_Nagasaki
1936 to 1958 Sardines and Anchovies
According to the US gov “The West Coast Pacific sardine fishery was first developed during World War I to fill an increased demand for nutritious food that could be canned and easily carried onto battlefields. The fishery rapidly expanded, and by the 1940s Pacific sardine supported the largest fishery in the Western Hemisphere, with approximately 200 active fishing vessels. Sardines accounted for almost 25 percent of all the fish landed in U.S. fisheries. Unfortunately, by the 1950s the resource and the fishery had collapsed and remained at low levels for nearly 40 years.” Article continues: http://www.fishwatch.gov/seafood_profiles/species/sardine/species_pages/pacific_sardine.htm As daily readers recall, the half life of Caesium 137 is 30 years.

According to Larry Pynn of the Vancouver Sun, October 15, 2013 in “Sardine fishery collapse affects economy, ecology“, not a single sardine was caught this year (2013) along the British Columbian coast meaning a $32-million business is inexplicably gone. (Article may be found online)

Here is some information about Polonium and sardine consumption:
In Portugal seafood accounts for 5% of food consumption but 70% of the ingestion of 210Po and 10% of the ingestion of 210Pb. Average doses to the Portuguese population were estimated to be about 85 mSv a-1 from 210Po and 170 mSv a-1 from 210Pb, with the dose due to 210Po varying from 25 mSv a-1 for a person consuming no seafood, 120 mSv a-1 for a high-rate consumer of sardines, and 1 mSv a-1 for a hypothetical group of mollusc consumershttp://ec.europa.eu/energy/nuclear/studies/doc/1999_12_marina2.pdf See: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Polonium
Don’t think you can necessarily escape by eating land animals or farm raised fish. Japan exports animal feed stuffs. And, chances are good that you have local radiation in your environment. Add to that, toxic sewage sludge is used on foods now in the US (and elsewhere), so that the radiation will get recycled that way! We know that human waste has long been used in poorer countries as fertilizer. We don’t know if other so-called developed countries use it or not, or just the USA. In the US it is supposedly “processed” against germs, but surely not against radiation.

Remember GE? The ones who helped bring us Fukushima?

Look in Reuters to see what they just bought!
They are rounding out their industry it seems. According to the Reuters article they are buying “cell culture, gene modulation and magnetic beads businesses“. Although not mentioned by Reuters, it is clear that they intend to make money from trying to halt cancers caused by their nuclear industry and trying to repair the damage. All will be a fat profit for them and a stiff price tag for either the sick person or the tax payer!
GE Hitachi Nuclear Energy (GEH) is a provider of advanced reactors and nuclear services. It is located in Wilmington, N.C.. Established in June 2007, GEH is a global nuclear alliance created by General Electric and Hitachi. In Japan, the alliance is Hitachi-GE Nuclear Energy, Ltd.http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/GE_Hitachi_Nuclear_Energy
If being accountable for your products can mean total bankruptcy for your company, there is a problem with your product. Yet nuclear suppliers are not accountable for the risk their products create, or for the moral issues that arise. Instead, if there is a problem, companies hide behind laws that give them unfair protection.
As former Babcock-Hitachi engineer Mitsuhiko Tanaka said in a Greenpeace video about a flawed reactor vessel Hitachi made for Fukushima: “when the stakes are raised to such a height, a company will not choose what is safe and legal. Even if it is dangerous they will choose to save the company from destruction.” …”If these companies whose products created such severe damage can walk away while the people are forced to pay the cost, the Fukushima disaster will be repeated.

Full article and petition here: http://www.greenpeace.org/international/en/news/Blogs/makingwaves/how-can-the-nuclear-industry-profit-from-nucl/blog/44192/

From Reuters below:”China approves massive new coal capacity despite pollution fears” Tue Jan 7, 2014 By David Stanway
From the article: “The scale of the increase, which only includes major mines, reflects Beijing’s aim to put 860 million tonnes of new coal production capacity into operation over the five years to 2015, more than the entire annual output of India.” (entire article in Reuters news feeds titles)

The stranded Antarctic Tour Boat and the Chinese boat, which rescued the tourists, have worked their way lose with no help from the US Coast Guard, it seems. China needs to charge the tour boat operator! Maybe Stupidity Insurance will pay?
From Reuters (below): “Stranded Antarctic ships break free of ice, heading to open sea” By Matt Siegel Sydney Tue Jan 7, 2014
“Australian rescue authorities advised the two captains to take advantage of cracks in the ice that appeared around the vessels on Tuesday evening. They have since made slow progress through lighter ice conditions towards the open sea.

In Reuters, below, it is discussed that:
At least five refineries in the U.S. and Canada curtailed supply after bitterly cold temperatures caused malfunctions and, in a few cases, full-scale closures.

While Indonesia is trying to process its minerals within the country to add more value to its exports, a US Congressman wants to change the law and let unprocessed crude oil be sold abroad. (Well, that’s the way it was supposed to be for Indonesia. Even as we were preparing this, they decided to post-pone this law.) Meanwhile, oil production in the US has reportedly declined. Not mentioned in today’s articles is the impact of fracking on the environment – both known, such as water and air pollution, but also the unknown impact of underground fracturing which could lead to sinkhole formation at some future date. Nor, of course, the human and financial cost of (additional) wars to obtain other people’s oil later, if the US sells its own oil abroad now. Normally countries are supposed to export processed products, i.e. value-added. Export of raw materials tends to be for poor, exploited countries. However, both drilling for oil, especially fracking, and refining are bad for the environment. Still, the refineries provide jobs, so from a short-term economics perspective it should normally be refined within the country of origin (i.e. USA).

Already before the New Brunswick derailment, a Reuters market analyst noted:
COLUMN-Fireballs jeopardise oil-by-rail business: Kemp Mon Jan 6, 2014 9:01am EST (John Kemp is a Reuters market analyst. The views expressed are his own) By John Kemp Jan 6 (Reuters) – The rising number of serious accidents involving oil tank cars over the past 12 months suggests that shippers are underestimating the safety risk of transporting crude by rail.” (See article below)

Oh, and the most singularly BIZARRE news item is that some US Judges think that having companies label whether products contain minerals from conflict regions (e.g. “Conflict diamonds”) violates a company’s free speech! Companies have free speech?

Selection of Reuters News Feeds

  • Stranded Antarctic ships break free of ice, heading to open sea

    Posted:Wed, 08 Jan 2014 00:57:52 GMT
    SYDNEY (Reuters) – A Russian research vessel and Chinese icebreaker stranded in Antarctica have broken free from the heavy ice that gripped them and are making steady progress towards open waters, the Australian Maritime Safety Authority (AMSA) said on Wednesday.
  • Incoming Czech minister backs new nuclear plant units, sees delay

    Posted:Tue, 07 Jan 2014 11:37:20 -0500
    PRAGUE, Jan 7 (Reuters) – The candidate set to become the Czech Republic’s next industry minister was quoted on Tuesday as saying he backed a plan to build two new units at the Temelin nuclear power plant but that he favoured some delay.
  • Titanium minerals exports to start from Kenyan mine this month

    Posted:Tue, 07 Jan 2014 11:18:38 -0500
    MOMBASA, Kenya, Jan 7 (Reuters) – Kenya’s first exports of titanium minerals will be shipped this month from its biggest mine, with sales amounting to $4 million in January and February, mine operator Base Resources said on Tuesday.
  • India’s coal imports rise 20 pct to help fuel new power plants

    Posted:Tue, 07 Jan 2014 06:49:50 -0500
    NEW DELHI, Jan 7 (Reuters) – India’s coal imports rose 20 percent to 105.8 million tonnes in April-October from a year earlier as power producers turned to Indonesia to help feed new plants, according to data from mjunction services, an online market operator.
  • Dutch aluminium smelter Aldel applies for bankruptcy

    Posted:Tue, 07 Jan 2014 06:10:25 -0500
    LONDON, Jan 7 (Reuters) – Dutch smelter Aluminium Delfzijl (Aldel) has applied for bankruptcy after failing to negotiate an energy deal, the company said on its website, the latest victim in a market plagued by oversupply and falling prices.
  • UPDATE 2-Indonesia mineral export ban uncertainty starts to bite

    Posted:Tue, 07 Jan 2014 05:58:20 -0500
    JAKARTA, Jan 7 (Reuters) – Indonesia’s planned mineral export ban – a policy designed to force miners to process their ores domestically – is sending shudders through the economy, with a Singapore-owned nickel miner suspending operations ahead of the Jan. 12 ban.
  • China jeweller Chow Tai Fook Q3 revenue up 26 pct

    Posted:Tue, 07 Jan 2014 03:46:17 -0500
    HONG KONG, Jan 7 (Reuters) – Hong Kong-listed Chow Tai Fook Jewellery Group Ltd, the world’s most valuable jewellery retailer, said on Tuesday its revenue grew 26 percent in the third quarter of fiscal 2014, driven by sales of both gold and gem-encrusted pieces.
  • UPDATE 2-Thermo Fisher sells cell culture, other businesses to GE

  • Posted:Mon, 06 Jan 2014 13:50:38 -0500
    Jan 6 (Reuters) – Thermo Fisher Scientific Inc said it would sell three businesses to General Electric Co’s healthcare unit for $1.06 billion, a deal that will enable Thermo Fisher to secure European antitrust approval for its acquisition of Life Technologies Corp.
  • UPDATE 2-Verso Paper to buy NewPage Holdings for $900 mln

    Posted:Mon, 06 Jan 2014 11:05:34 -0500
    Jan 6 (Reuters) – Coated paper maker Verso Paper Corp said it would buy privately held NewPage Holdings Inc for about $900 million in cash and bonds to form a more cost-efficient company that can cope with increasing pressure from digital media.
  • COLUMN-Fireballs jeopardise oil-by-rail business: Kemp

    Posted:Mon, 06 Jan 2014 09:01:09 -0500
    (John Kemp is a Reuters market analyst. The views expressed are his own)

Tuesday 7 January 2014

We decided to do a Part II of the Radioactive Reindeer: https://miningawareness.wordpress.com/2014/01/07/radioactive-reindeer-part-ii/ There is no urgent Reuters news within Basic
Materials or Energy news. We have saved it and will post later.

Monday 6 January 2014

According to Reuters News Feeds (below), in South Sudan hugs have given way to gun-fire (yes, hugs…). Australia is having serious problems with fires. (Fire hazard needs to be considered when they site their nuclear waste dump). The Catholic Church has asked for cleanup of waste dumped by the Camorra mafia in Italy over the course of 22 years. We made a new post on the topic: https://miningawareness.wordpress.com/2014/01/06/church-tells-italian-officials-to-hurry-up-address-toxic-waste-dumped-by-camorra-mafia/ Will the Camorra mafia pay? Surely not. It will be the Italian taxpayer, we guess, usually called “the government”. This new post has a link to an article which can be of interest for those who are interested in the topic of radiation.

The winner of the irksome news titles from the last day and a half would be this:
Polar Star 2 http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/USCGC_Polar_Star_(WAGB-10)
USCG Polar Star 2

The Polar Star US Coast Guard Icebreaker is going to try to save a Chinese ship, which got stuck in Antarctic ice, while rescuing some Australians, who stupidly rented a Russian ship for tourism (it’s summer and hot in Australia now so probably that ice looked really good) and for historical reenactment purposes. It has been criticized by numerous scientists for having disrupted the servicing of real Antarctic research centers. Where are the Russian icebreakers? Surely at work to get their oil laden ships through. The tourist cruise boat organizer had better pay back the US and Chinese tax payers! They needed to have left those tourists to cool off some more in Antarctica. It seems that this happened on the trip they are reenacting, anyway. Mawson got stuck and nearly died.

What is mind-boggling is that, as you will see in the Reuters news feeds, the US EPA is said to lack the money and man-power to properly monitor fracking. We have already seen that the US EPA does not professionally run the RadNet either, presumably for financial reasons. But, they can rescue a Chinese boat, which was rescuing a bunch of people lacking in total common sense, and who are neither Chinese nor Americans: Australians on a Russian boat! The Australian government should be able to afford a good icebreaker with all of that mining! Most of Australia has been dug up by mining and is becoming a desert! Where did that money go? (Even if there are US citizens or Chinese citizens on the boat, and there might be, the US and Chinese governments still need to be paid back by the trip organizer).

Russia has bunches of icebreakers, according to the list below. The US has only 3. China is listed as having only one or two.

When Russia spills oil in the Arctic is it going to be China and the US Coast Guard to the Rescue and Russia doing as it pleases? It seems that since the boat was flagged in Russia they should be responsible for the boat, like the Netherlands was for the Greenpeace vessel.

Someone is probably going to say that there was no Russian icebreaker in the neighborhood. Maybe that is so, but let the people wait. Let them learn common sense the hard way. These tourists had more money than sense! Gone are the days when governments can frivolously throw their tax payers monies away!
The name of the stuck boat is the Akademik Shokalskiy. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Akademik_Shokalskiy http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_icebreakers

Reuters News Feed Selection

  • UPDATE 1-Libya warns against buying crude from seized oil ports in east

    Posted:Sat, 04 Jan 2014 20:10:17 GMT

    TRIPOLI, Jan 4 (Reuters) – Libya warned customers against buying any crude offered by a pro-autonomy group which seized three oil ports in the east of the OPEC producer more than five months ago, the state oil firm said on Saturday.

  • S.Sudan rebels to meet government negotiators Sunday – Ethiopia

    Posted:Sat, 04 Jan 2014 15:26:39 GMT

    ADDIS ABABA, Jan 4 (Reuters) – South Sudanese rebels will begin face-to-face talks with the government, aimed at ending weeks of ethnic bloodletting, at 1200 GMT on Sunday after several days of delay, an Ethiopian official said on Saturday.

  • China pledges further support for solar industry

    Posted:Sat, 04 Jan 2014 09:28:29 GMT
    SHANGHAI, Jan 4 (Reuters) – China pledged further support support for its ailing solar power industry on Saturday as the government seeks to revive a sector struggling with with overcapacity and falling prices.

Sunday, 5 January 2014

Our post https://miningawareness.wordpress.com/2013/12/25/radioactive-reindeer/ has been updated.

News titles have been saved but will update later.

Saturday, 4 January 2014

On Folly – “Le Fou

There are levels of folly, there is individual folly, of course, but there is also the folly of a community of mankind that has the arrogance to believe that somehow we can destroy Mother Nature and maintain the quality of our own lives. And, that, that makes me crazy.” Zachary Richard (see video):

Cultural activist, environmentalist poet and singer-songwriter Zachary Richard’s roots are deeply planted in his native Louisiana…Le Fou is Zachary’s 20th album… The title song (Le Fou – The Crazy) was inspired by the Deepwater Horizon spill of 2010. The first bird to be captured and cleaned in April of that year was a northern gannet, whose name in French is ‘Fou de Bassan’ (Crazy from Bassan). The folly of which the song speaks is the folly of mankind in destroying the natural environment. It’s enough to make you crazy.http://www.zacharyrichard.com/english/biography.php (bold added)
Zachary Richard singing his song “Le Fou” in New Orleans:

Lyrics in French: http://www.zacharyrichard.com/lyrics/le_fou_fr.html

Zachary Richard explains more about the song:”…’Fou’ can best be translated as ‘crazy’, and the bird is so named because of its devil-may-care fishing style, plunging into the water from great height at 100 kilometers an hour. In the case of this song the folly referred to is the folly of disregarding the balance of nature for immediate gain and the folly of not understanding the consequences of the destruction of the natural environment.” (bold added) Commentary and Lyrics in English: http://www.zacharyrichard.com/lyrics/le_fou_en.html

T\'f6lpelperce
Fous de Bassan (Morus bassanus) on Île Bonaventure, Percé, Québec via wikimedia.

In the song the Fou de Bassan bird flies to safety in Quebec-Gulf of St. Lawrence, Canada. But, they winter further south in the USA, and, they are trying to drill for oil and gas in the Gulf of St. Lawrence too: http://canadians.org/node/9300 So, unlike in the song, there is really no place left to hide. According to Environment Canada:
…the release of oil as a result of the pumping of bilge waters at sea or shipping accidents has killed a large number of gannets. The serious risks of pollution created by offshore drilling pose yet another threat to the survival of gannets. When birds come into contact with oil, their feathers become matted. The natural oils that give the feathers their water-repellant properties are dissolved, thereby reducing the insulating capacity of their plumage. In addition, birds may swallow the oil while feeding or preening, and this can result in chronic poisoning. Nonetheless, the gannet is less exposed to the adverse effects of oil than seabirds that spend more time on the water.” (bold added) http://www.hww.ca/en/species/birds/northern-gannet.htmlEvery year, more than 300 000 birds are killed by oil off the south coast of the island of Newfoundland alone. Many oiled birds that wash ashore must be humanely killed, because cleaning oiled birds is largely ineffective.http://www.hww.ca/en/issues-and-topics/oil-pollution-and-birds.html

Starting to come to their senses?

From Reuters: “Robert Harms, chairman of North Dakota’s Republican party and an energy industry consultant, told Reuters on Thursday that a “moderated approach” was needed amid an energy boom that has transformed the local economy, but created safety concerns…This week, a 106-car BNSF train carrying crude east from the Bakken crashed into a derailed westbound BNSF grain train near the town of Casselton, setting off explosions and a fire that burned for more than 24 hours. No one was injured. “I think it’s a good wake up call for all of us, both local and state officials, as well as the people with the oil and gas industry and the transportation industry,” Harms said in his first interview after the accident. “Even people within the oil and gas industry that I’ve talked to feel that sometimes we’re just going too fast and too hard,” said Harms, who has also supported regulation that would require producers to cut back on flaring natural gas.http://feeds.reuters.com/~r/reuters/USenergyNews/~3/nVi6_doUcVs/story01.htm

Louisiana Texas Brine Collapsing Salt Dome-Sinkhole at Bayou Corne update:


December 18, 2013 Flyover of Bayou Corne Collapsing Salt Dome

Trees are starting to fall in again, as reported Friday, January 3rd. No one knows if the saltdome-sinkhole will grow slowly or finish opening up all at once. However, it will double from its 26 acres (October est.) to at least about 52 acres before it stops.
11:20 a.m. Update from the Office of Conservation
Bayou Corne/Grand Bayou Response Activity
Friday, Jan. 3 work-
Sinkhole Activity Code 3 – indicating no work is allowed directly on sinkhole or within containment berms. Seismic monitoring indicates ongoing increased levels of subsurface activity near sinkhole/Oxy 3 – slough-in of trees observed on western side of sinkhole (east of original western containment berm route) – state and parish will continue to closely observe seismic activity to advise of any sudden changes.
http://assumptionla.wordpress.com/2014/01/03/1120-a-m-update-from-the-office-of-conservation-3/

The sinkhole has been nicknamed “Lake Fubar”:
And the presidents and dictators of the earth, and the stooges, and the 1%, and the fracking-waste barge captains and the tiny men, and every dirty banker and every unjailed Louisianan, hid themselves far away from Lake FUBAR. As the cypress trees keep castething into it. Lo!
http://lasinkhole.wordpress.com/2014/01/03/revelations/ For the entire prose piece see link. For all information on the Louisiana Sinkhole go to lasinkhole.wordpress.com

For sinkhole watchers and others,
Here’s some mood music by Zachary Richard:

Here’s a more traditional melancholic song about a bird in a tree along a lake in Louisiana (Lac Bijou):

http://www.zacharyrichard.com/lyrics/auboarddelacbijou-en.html http://www.zacharyrichard.com/lyrics/auboarddelacbijou.html

Some birds won’t find their trees anymore at Bayou Corne….

Another song on the impacts of the oil, gas, and petrochemical industry in Louisiana (in English):

From “Sunset on Louisianne
by Zachary Richard
My sister lost her baby premature,
And my papa got the sickness that got no cure,
And what they told us about it at the plant,
We could not be sure.

Smokestacks burning on the river,
From New Orleans to Baton Rouge.
How can I go on believing
When the won’t tell me the truth.
….
I love the river and I love the swamp,
The snowy egret and the old bull frog,
But they’re harder to find one and all
Since the industry came to town.” http://www.zacharyrichard.com/lyrics/sunsetonlouisianne.html

Be certain to read about France’s Areva and its uranium mine in Niger below:

Selection from Reuters News Feeds:

Friday, 3 January 2014

[Our Radioactive Reindeer post has been updated today: https://miningawareness.wordpress.com/2013/12/25/radioactive-reindeer ]

One increasingly has the feeling of living in Victorian times when there were no food or any other standards. Look at the high amount of radiation allowed in the food in the US, Australia, Canada, making them ripe for being a dumping ground for contaminated food from Japan and elsewhere. Japan itself has much better food standards, so you know where their contaminated food will go! (See: https://miningawareness.wordpress.com/2013/12/25/radioactive-reindeer ) Poor Haitians got this figured out early on when Japan donated them rice. They got angry. Few others seem to have worked this out. Not enough has been done for Fukushima and it is not clear if it will be. If you look at maps of ocean currents it suggests that places far away from Japan will end up with their pollution – including the US and Canadian west coasts. However, the currents split once or twice. Is it right that the world is punished for Japan’s sins? Japan is the most closed society in the world, with the exception of North Korea, allowing virtually no immigration. Why should the world pay for the corruption, greed and sins of Japan’s elites and their joint-venture partners in the west such as majority French gov owned Areva, who reportedly sold them MOX fuel? Rio Tinto of London has also made money supplying uranium to Japan’s nuclear industry. The entire world will pay dearly, some more than others. The experience of the Reindeer herders in Finland and Scandinavia, still today impacted by Chernobyl, so very far away from them, teaches us this. France, major culprits in this matter, will be among the least impacted. However, that is if they stop Fukushima from leaking. If not, we may all die if the Pacific becomes so polluted that it kills all of the ocean plants which give the world oxygen.

According to Reuters news feeds (see below), the State (Commonwealth) of Pennsylvania is appealing its own Supreme court because the court stepped in to protect the health and welfare of the people, as laid out in the State Constitution.
(See also: https://miningawareness.wordpress.com/2013/12/21/pennsylvania-supreme-court-restores-local-control-over-fracking-amish-flee-ohio-oil-boom-return-to-pennsylvania/ )
Fracking not only undermines their right to clean water and air, but the new proposed law undermines zoning and property rights. The purpose of zoning is to protect the right of peace and safety in the home (and indirectly property values). The State of Pennsylvania, working on behalf of the fracking industry, wants to destroy the right of local governments to have zoning, opening everywhere up to fracking.

Here are a few excerpts from the ruling:
The litigation implicates, among many other sources of law, a provision of this Commonwealth’s organic charter, specifically Section 27 of the Declaration of Rights in the Pennsylvania Constitution, which states:
The people have a right to clean air, pure water, and to the preservation of the natural, scenic, historic and esthetic values of the environment. Pennsylvania’s public natural resources are the common property of all the people, including generations yet to come. As trustee of these resources, the Commonwealth shall conserve and maintain them for the benefit of all the people. PA. CONST. art. I, § 27 (the “Environmental Rights Amendment”). Following careful
deliberation, this Court holds that several challenged provisions of Act 13 are unconstitutional, albeit the Court majority affirming the finding of unconstitutionality is not of one mind concerning the ground for decision.
http://www.delawareriverkeeper.org/resources/Reports/Opinion%20J-127A-D-2012oajc.pdf
Regarding Fracking techniques they observe:
Both techniques inevitably do violence to the landscape. Slick-water fracking involves pumping at high pressure into the rock formation a mixture of sand and freshwater treated with a gel friction reducer, until the rock cracks, resulting in greater gas mobility. Horizontal drilling requires the drilling of a vertical hole to 5,500 to 6,500 feet — several hundred feet above the target natural gas pocket or reservoir — and then directing the drill bit through an arc until the drilling proceeds sideways or horizontally. One unconventional gas well in the Marcellus Shale uses several million gallons of water.” http://www.delawareriverkeeper.org/resources/Reports/Opinion%20J-127A-D-2012oajc.pdf

This is a critically important ruling, not only from the vantage of environmental law, but perhaps more importantly the right to private property and the related right of feeling safe and protected in one’s home. Isn’t private property supposed to be the founding principal of capitalism in general and the US in particular? Apparently only if you are a corporation! Really the international ideal is to put everyone in a tiny apartment where they have to pay ever increasing rent for their entire lives. Private home ownership -at its best- offers people safety and security in their old age (we are leaving aside all those who got screwed out of their houses by the unscrupulous). The Pennsylvania pro-fracking law undermines the entire concept of zoning. Zoning is, above all, an issue of safety public and welfare.

We failed to mention,
Special Report: Lost hooves, dead cattle before Merck halted Zilmax sales By P. J. Huffstutter and Tom Polansek Walla Walla County, Washington
Mon Dec 30, 2013 5:19pm EST
http://www.reuters.com/article/2013/12/30/us-zilmax-merck-cattle-special-report-idUSBRE9BT0NV20131230 A drug to fatten cows before they are sold at market and which appears to make their hooves fall off. Also, still antibiotics seem to be used even though they contribute to antibiotic resistant bacteria. Doctors have avoided giving humans unnecessary antibiotics for decades, in order to try to keep antibiotic resistant bacteria strains from developing! And farm animals are still getting them?! The FDA may now cut out antibiotics but not Zilmax, which is not an antibiotic…..

Today Reuters has news of a new Kazakhstan pipeline having to be closed right after it just opened. Despite cost overruns it appears that they may not have been “able to afford” better quality, resistant material. That is, they may not have made the pipes with an alloyed or not properly alloyed steel, required for stress in cold temperatures: the same problem that made the Daniel Morrell and many other ships sink, perhaps even the Titantic. See: https://miningawareness.wordpress.com/2013/11/29/the-sinking-of-the-ss-daniel-j-morrell-on-lake-huron-november-29-1966/

Eni-Agip of Italy was initially responsible for the construction and delivery (from 2001/2002 to 2008/2009) of the Kashagan pipeline in Kazakhstan. Pipe seems to have been supplied ca 2006 or 2007 by a Japanese company (don’t you know!): “Sumitomo Metal Industries Ltd, which merged with Nippon Steel Corp in 2012 to become Nippon Steel & Sumitomo Metal Corp (NSSM), supplied pipe to Kashagan seven years ago, according to a company official who did not want to be named. The official said some of the pipes that leaked were among those supplied by Sumitomo. He said the company had been asked to look into the past manufacturing record of the pipes supplied to Kashagan and found they met all requirements.”
http://feeds.reuters.com/~r/reuters/basicmaterialsNews/~3/tnq_E4lHcEo/kazakhstan-kashagan-structure-idUSL6N0JX20Y20140102 This certainly looks like an Italian-Japanese, Mafia, Yakuza job doesn’t it? What standards did they meet? Did they have forged certification?

South Korea nuclear power plants have been reopened after having been closed because of cables having been supplied using fake certification. 100 were indicted in this matter. The nuclear power industry has a great “safety culture”. Just ask them and they will be happy to tell you that. Are you convinced?

Upton Sinclair’s book “The Jungle” springs constantly to mind these days (NB: Teddy Roosevelt was a Republican): “President Theodore Roosevelt had described Sinclair as … hysterical, unbalanced, and untruthful… After reading The Jungle… Roosevelt wrote, “radical action must be taken to do away with the efforts of arrogant and selfish greed on the part of the capitalist.”[12] http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Jungle Note that Republican president Roosevelt wrote about “arrogant and selfish greed on the part of the capitalist”. This was imperialist Teddy. This was a critique from within the capitalist system, not from without.

Theodore Roosevelt “assigned the Labor Commissioner Charles P. Neill and social worker James Bronson Reynolds to go to Chicago to investigate some meat packing facilities. Learning about the visit, owners had their workers thoroughly clean the factories prior to the inspection, but Neill and Reynolds were still revolted by the conditions. Their oral report to Roosevelt supported much of what Sinclair portrayed in the novel…the Bureau of Animal Industry issued a report rejecting Sinclair’s most severe allegations, characterizing them as “intentionally misleading and false,” “willful and deliberate misrepresentations of fact,” and “utter absurdity.”[15] Roosevelt did not release the Neill-Reynolds Report for publication. His administration submitted it directly to Congress on June 4, 1906.[16] Public pressure led to the passage of the Meat Inspection Act and the Pure Food and Drug Act of 1906; the latter established the Bureau of Chemistry (in 1930 renamed as the Food and Drug Administration).http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Jungle (references at link) Thus, the origin of the US Food and Drug Administration which is supposed to protect US food. But, with their having raised the amount of radiation allowed in food ca 1998, one can only wonder what their current mission is. It indirectly allows the nuclear industry and uranium mining industry to carry on without cleanup, etc, while telling everyone it is ok.

Next time you see someone glorifying Warren Buffett, think again. As might be expected his money hasn’t come honest. If he were an honest man he would have put the money into making his tank railroad cars up to standard and there would not be repeated incidences of one of his BNSF trains hitting another. (Ongoing Sage 10). One day Reuters says that the price tag for bringing the trains up to proper standards would be $1 billion and one day $3 billion. However, this is for all tank cars, not just his. But little matter when you are worth $53.5 billion like Buffett. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Forbes_list_of_billionaires Berthshire Hathaway is owner of BNSF rail: “The vast bulk of Buffett’s wealth consists of his personal holdings in the Berkshire Hathaway Corporation, a conglomerate of which he controls almost 40% directly, and which he has managed personally since the mid-1960s.http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Buffett_Foundation

Yesterday we posted this feed which explains that the BNSF train which exploded and caught fire wasn’t up to standard, lacking proper safety valves and being of too flimsy (thin) a material:

Railcars in North Dakota crude train crash older, less safe -investigators

Posted:Wed, 01 Jan 2014 01:27:36 GMT
FARGO, N.D., Dec 31 (Reuters) – The railcars carrying crude oil that crashed into a derailed grain train in North Dakota on Monday were all older types that do not meet the latest industry safety standards, a member of the National Transportation Safety Board said on Tuesday.

Today, according to Reuters, they are trying to say that the Bakken oil is more flammable, but is that just a way to get around the issue of substandard tanks? The explosion last summer of Bakken oil, in Quebec, seems to have involved substandard tracks. Most likely substandard tanks as well. All of this has to do with cost-cutting to make money at the expense of safety.

Zoning and property rights are also related to the issue of rail safety. If you have a railroad too near a residential area or any dangerous industry near a residential area, the dangers are increased for the population. There is, of course, the issue of noise and pollution, as well. Hence, industrial zoning, residential zoning, and commercial zoning. A big problem is that many towns were built prior to zoning and when railroads only went through towns once a day and that was in the daytime. Hence, you often see fancy Victorian houses right up against the railroad tracks. (This may not be written anywhere but after wondering for years this author finally figured this out). Some places, especially in Europe, simply do not have zoning.

Video of BNSF train explosion and fire

Below is the town which lies about one mile away from where Warren Buffett’s BNSF train derailed and was hit by another BNSF train which caught fire. Had it derailed in town you can see how disastrous this could have been. People might have been burned and vaporized, just like they were in Lac Megantic Quebec. He would have had major blood on his hands.
Casselton, North Dakota
If you see that brown stripe just above the orange spot and under the white “W”, that is the railroad. The derailment-fire-explosion was west of the town. What if it had not been?
Lac Megantic Quebec
Lac Megantic Quebec

Lac Megantic Quebec zoom into crash area
Lac Megantic zoom in to affected area

Lac megantic affected area
Lac Megantic affected area

The Lac-Mégantic derailment occurred in the town of Lac-Mégantic, located in the Eastern Townships of the Canadian province of Quebec, at approximately 01:15 EDT,[1][2] on July 6, 2013, when an unattended 74-car[3][4][5][6][7] freight train carrying Bakken formation crude oil ran away and derailed, resulting in the fire and explosion of multiple tank cars. Forty-two people are confirmed dead with 5 more missing and presumed dead.[8] More than 30 buildings in the town’s centre, roughly half of the downtown area, were destroyed.[2] Initial newspaper reports described a 1 km blast radius.[9]
It is the fourth deadliest rail accident in Canadian history,[10] and the deadliest rail disaster in Canada since the St-Hilaire train disaster in 1864.[11][nb 1]
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lac-Mégantic_derailment
Lac-Megantic derailment from space
Lac Megantic derailment fire from space (NASA)
The local hospital went to Code Orange, anticipating a high number of casualties and requesting reinforcements from other medical centres, but they received no seriously injured patients. A Canadian Red Cross volunteer said there were “no wounded. They’re all dead“. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lac-Mégantic_derailment
Lac megantic burning
Lac Megantic Burning. Photo by the Sûreté du Québec.

Transport Canada permits a railway line to remain in service with as little as five solid ties (British English = sleepers) and fourteen damaged ties in a 39 feet (12 m) section of track,[15] provided trains are limited to 10 mph (16 km/h) on straight flat track.[16] MMA failed to take advantage of millions of dollars of available federal/provincial 2:1 matching infrastructure grants under a 2007 program as track conditions on the MMA line in Quebec continued to deteriorate. By 2013, speed reductions were required on 23 portions of the line, including a 5 mph (8.0 km/h) limit at Sherbrooke yard and 10 miles per hour (16 km/h) on a 11 miles (18 km) stretch east of Magog” http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lac-Mégantic_derailment

“Forty-two bodies have been found and transported to Montreal to be identified.[94] 39 of these were identified by investigators by late August 2013.[95] Identification of additional victims became increasingly difficult after the August 1 end of the on-site search and family members were asked to provide DNA samples of those missing, as well as dental records.[96] The bodies of five presumed victims were never found.[97][98] It is possible that some of the missing people were vaporized by the explosions.[99] As two of the three local notary offices have been destroyed by fire (and only one of the document vaults survived the blaze), the last will and testament of some victims of the disaster has been lost.[100][101]” http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lac-Mégantic_derailment

“At least 30 buildings were destroyed in the centre of town, including the town’s library, a historic former bank, and other businesses and houses.[79] A hundred and fifteen businesses were destroyed, displaced, or rendered inaccessible.[102] The Musi-Café—a bar located next to the centre of the explosions—was destroyed and three of its employees are among the dead or missing.[103][104][105] While the town intends to build new infrastructure and commercial space, many of the historic buildings lost are irreplaceable.” http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lac-Mégantic_derailment

Here is the list of those deceased following the events of the 6th of July 2013 at Lac-Mégantic, and of whom the identity was confirmed by the Quebec coroner (Monsieur is Mr. and Madame is Mrs. or Ms.):

Madame Éliane Parenteau, 93 years old
Monsieur Frédéric Boutin, 19 years old
Madame Kathy Clusiault, 24 years old
Madame Élodie Turcotte, 18 years old
Monsieur Yannick Bouchard, 36 years old
Madame Karine Lafontaine, 35 years old
Monsieur Maxime Dubois, 27 years old
Madame Mélissa Roy, 29 years old
Monsieur Yves Boulet, 51 years old
Madame Karine Champagne, 36 years old
Monsieur Gaétan Lafontaine, 33 years old
Madame Joanie Turmel, 29 years old
Monsieur Roger Paquet, 61 years old
Madame Jo-Annie Lapointe, 20 years old
Monsieur Guy Bolduc, 43 years old
Madame Andrée-Anne Sévigny, 26 years old
Madame Diane Bizier, 46 years old
Monsieur David Lacroix-Beaudoin, 27 years old
Monsieur Stéphane Bolduc, 37 years old
Madame Marianne Poulin, 23 years old
Madame Geneviève Breton, 28 years old
Monsieur Mathieu Pelletier, 29 years old
Madame Sylvie Charron, 50 years old
Madame Henriette Latulippe, 61 years old
Monsieur David Martin, 36 years old
Monsieur Jean-Pierre Roy, 56 years old
Monsieur Jean-Guy Veilleux, 32 years old
Madame Lucie Vadnais, 49 years old
Monsieur Michel Junior Guertin, 33 years old
Madame Natachat Gaudreau, 41 years old
Monsieur Kevin Roy, 29 years old
Monsieur Éric Pépin-Lajeunesse, 28 years old
Madame Talitha Coumi Bégnoche, 30 years old
Monsieur Stéphane Lapierre, 45 years old
Madame Marie-Noëlle Faucher, 36 years old
Monsieur Martin Rodrigue, 48 years old
Monsieur Réal Custeau, 57 years old
Madame Marie-Sémie Alliance, 22 years old
Alyssa Charest Bégnoche, 4 years old http://www.coroner.gouv.qc.ca/index.php?id=149

Our Selection of Reuters News Feeds  

  • Australia shares pull back on soft China data, gold miners jump

    Posted:Thu, 02 Jan 2014 19:30:50 -0500
    SYDNEY, Jan 3 (Reuters) – Australian shares fell 0.7 percent on Friday, with big banks and miners weighing as investors took profits at the index’s 6-week highs after seeing signs of weakness in Chinese manufacturing data. China’s factory activity slowed in December, official and private manufacturing surveys showed, reinforcing views that growth in the world’s second-largest economy moderated in the final quarter of 2013. “We saw that Chinese PMI number yesterday was a little bit lower
  • Shanghai paying price of China’s campaign against industrial pollution

    Posted:Thu, 02 Jan 2014 16:00:00 -0500
    By David Stanway BEIJING, Jan 3 (Reuters) – Chinese steel production is moving from its heartland in Hebei province in the wake of government efforts to tackle pollution near Beijing, but Shanghai could be paying the price as steel mills around the commercial capital ramp up output. Stricter environmental checks in Hebei have also created opportunities for polluting industries such as cement and glass-making plants in provinces near Shanghai. While air pollution rates in Beijing and
  • US STOCKS-Wall St dips on first trading day of 2014; techs weigh

    Posted:Thu, 02 Jan 2014 12:13:55 -0500

    * Among top decliners are stocks that gained most in 2013

  • UPDATE 1-Rebel ambush kills army commander in eastern Congo

    Posted:Thu, 02 Jan 2014 10:03:44 -0500

    (Adds government statement saying ADF-NALU was responsible)

  • Crippled Kashagan oil project a bureaucratic “nightmare”

  • Posted:Thu, 02 Jan 2014 01:00:00 -0500

    * Production halted shortly after start-up by pipeline leaks